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Category : using strobes

29 Jun 2019

TurtleRig Bulb Extension

I was recently made aware of the TurtleRig Bulb Extension through Flashhavoc. An intriguing piece of kit and for $20.95 through Amazon I decided to try one. I wanted to test its capabilities for two specific reasons:

  • Does adding more resistance to the bulb reduce the amount of power the light delivers?
  • How much more light can be obtained by moving the bulb further into a modifier?

Prior to the TurtleRig being introduced I have been using the Cheetahstand low profile Bowens speedring to move my Flashpoint bulbs closer into the modifiers.

 

For the testing I conducted, all tests were performed at full power of a Flashpoint 600 strobe 1:1. The meter I used is a Sekonic L358, my tried and true light meter. The meter was set at ISO 100 1/60th shutter speed and the flash intensity was measured in f Stops.

My first test was to determine if the modeling light would be affected by moving the bulb further away from the LED of the Flashpoint 600.

And yes it is effected:

  • Without the TurtleRig measured 18″ from the LED f6.3
  • With the TurtleRig installed measured 18″ from the LED f4.5

Both were measured using the brightest modeling light setting.

Next was my bare bulb test to determine if the TurtleRig’s added resistance reduces the power of the light:

  • Without the TurtleRig measured 18″ from the bulb f57
  • With the TurtleRig installed measured 18″ from the bulb f51

The next test was very interesting. I used one of my favorite modifiers, the Elinchrom 39″ Rotalux Deep Octabox with only the inner diffusion panel inserted. I use the configuration most often when using this modifier. I like the added specularity of the light by not using both the inner and outer diffusion panels.

Here’s where things got very interesting….

  • Without the TurtleRig measured 18″ from the end of the modifier’s edge f40
  • With the TurtleRig installed measured 18″ from the end of the modifier’s edge f40!

The SAME! I tested it over and over and over and it was always the same!

So I decided to move my meter twice as far away from the edge, 36″ or three feet:

  • Without the TurtleRig measured 18″ from the end of the modifier’s edge f25
  • With the TurtleRig installed measured 18″ from the end of the modifier’s edge f29

AH, so what I can surmise is that by having the bulb extend further into my modifier the difference can be seen the further the talent is away from the modifier. Makes sense since the bulb has the ability to fill the modifier more efficiently than if it is not extended into the modifier.

I will continue to test this device with larger modifiers like my Elinchrom 69″ Rotalux Octabox. The quality of light will also be assessed.

Stay tuned….

26 Mar 2019

Creating a Concept

One of my favorite things to do is to imagine a concept and then execute it. This post is about concepts, mood and light rather than gear. Oh sure it takes gear to have my concepts go from only in my head to fruition, but if you’re looking for a gear review, it’s best to keep moving along.

I wanted to photograph Jeannette, a dear friend’s daughter who was studying ballet in two different concepts. I gave her a general idea of them; one would be as if she was dancing in a grand ballroom. The other was to appear as if I was on stage BEHIND the ballerina shooting downstage toward the audience. And finally I wanted to see if I could configure a lighting protocol where while under an umbrella I could light the ballerina’s face.

So once the concept was developed finding a venue and prop was necessary. A large warehouse along with a non-lit chandelier was needed for my grand ballroom concept. I would light the chandelier using a strobe and long throw reflector. Combining incandescent light, like a tungsten lit chandelier would be very difficult to balance with my strobes. They would overpower incandescent light no matter how low I powered down my strobes. It could be done, but why when I can light it and balance it with a strobe?

The warehouse setup. Just out of frame camera left is my strobe used to illuminate the chandelier using a PCB Retro Laser modifier. Sadly no longer made.

Getting a sense of the correct height for the chandelier. “Close your eyes while I test the light!”

This octa modifier was used to simulate light coming down from the chandelier which appears to illuminate her. I moved it so that a shadow would be cast down from her tutu.

My ballroom shot. Two key lights stacked. A Fresnel and the octa. One produces a hard light/shadow, the other a softer filling light. Stacking modifiers is one of my favorite techniques.

Chandelier lowered and smoke added for atmosphere to give a different mood.

The next concept was a tad more difficult, making it appear as if I am actually on stage shooting toward the audience. Using two Fresnel heads on my strobes to appear as spotlights to create drama and spotlight shadows ‘on the stage’ was in order. And then to balance a fill light for her back was delicate to do. I also knew I wanted to add atmosphere to the shot which would add a mystic mood to the image.

Balancing the lights.

OOPS! Mark that’s a tad too much smoke! LOL

The ‘spotlight’ shadows are spot on here.

And finally how can I light someone’s face under an umbrella? Ah using a simple speed light and a homemade rig to hold it under the umbrella was the answer!

Not nearly as attractive as Jeannette, her father graciously helps me test my contraption!

And it worked just as I had hoped it would.

What was this all for anyway? Practice! My belief is practicing the execution of concepts keeps me sharp and improves what I can offer clients and myself in creating imagery. For me it’s not about what gear I own. It’s how I use it.

04 Mar 2019

Combining Tools

I know there are a ton of online sites that show specific lights/cameras/etc. along with their specs and such. I wanted to write this post about combining all of the tools we all have at our disposal to create an image. FIRST AND FOREMOST the paramount factor in my shooting is NOT the gear, but the concept. Of course the right gear makes my job easier, but without a solid concept and how to execute that concept, no amount of cool gear matters in my world. My clients come to me looking for several solid concepts to create for a final image. Most have ‘some‘ ideas, but they are depending on me to flesh out their ideas. The two most valuable assets I can provide to them are the final concepts and the talent’s expressions. Authentic expressions can’t be created in post processing.

Testing all six strobes prior to the actual shoot along with the smoke machine. Smoke is great, but just like all things organic, you CANNOT control where the wind blows! LOL

I wanted to share the video my partner created as I was shooting the promotional materials for a small theatre company’s production of “Heathers.” This video shows in detail how the shoot was created for the client. BTW I always shoot wirelessly tethered to my iPad using the Canon WFT-E6A (replaced by the WFT-E8A) through Shuttersnitch. Both the client and I then know when the shot has been achieved and we can then move onto the next shot. Much more efficient for me than taking a break to show the talent and client things on the back of my camera. I still do that when needed, but it is much more the exception rather than the rule.

In the video the constant key light modifier was a Glow EZ Lock Quick Octa powered by a Westcott SKYLUX 1000 Watt LED Light.

Here are the items I used AFTER scouting a location for the shoot and conveying my concepts to the client:

Using battery powered equipment is key to my on location shoots. Wireless everything has been a godsend in the last 12 years. No more cords which were replaced with remote triggers, remote control over strobes…wow. The only reason I used a generator was to power the smoke machine. In those instances where gas generators are not allowed I use a Goal Zero Yeti 1000 solar generator for my smoke machine when called for in a shoot.

I selected the Ego Power leaf blower because it has variable power, not stepped power. During those times when I need to have a wind machine I need the ability for my assistants to either subtlely or forcefully use wind. As of this posting I cannot show the actual publicity shots the client will use, but can display shots they have opted not to use for the promotion.

What will be of interest is the video my partner Tracy Martin created for the client which has been released. My point of this post is to help others in displaying how combining all of the tools now available to photographers is only limited by your imagination.

Four strobes in various positions including to illuminate the smoke. Key light using the PCB Omni reflector. It’s great in wind and produces the quality of light I wanted.

Six strobe shot.

Six strobe shot.

If you can’t have fun in an on location shoot, what fun is that?!

19 Feb 2019

Flashpoint eVOLV 200 Round Flash Head

February 18 2019

I recently used the Flashpoint eVOLV 200 Round Flash Head attached to an AD200 during a professional tango shoot. I like the modeling lamp in the head and find it brighter than the stock Fresnel head in the AD200. I used the light with a ‘voice activated light stand’ (a human) in this instance. Because the Argentine Tango dancers were moving freely a normal light stand just would not be the best tool for the job. Plus the room was filled with haze and the rays of light coming through the doorway made balancing light a challenge. 

A haze filled room with rays of light coming through the open door was magical.

The quality of light produced by the Round Flash head is very very nice. I won’t ever hesitate to use it when it’s the right tool for the right job. And in this case it was.

11 Feb 2019

Dance lighting setup – UPDATE February 11 2019

UPDATE February 11 2019

I realized I had posted some of my lighting techniques under a different blog heading about the v2.0 Saberstrip modifiers, which I consider to be a revolutionary modifier, but had not updated this post. I do so because I find the v2.0 Saberstrips to be almost invaluable for me in creating dance imagery. In some cases I have used three of them to light dancers in studio. As an overhead light on a boom arm and two on each side of the dancers as rim lights. It creates a very dramatic sculpture of their forms as they move. I have also taken to using my 10″ Fresnel to light dancers. I love the light produced by a large lens Fresnel. A hard contrasty light that is unlike any other modifier.

In this image you can see the three v2.0 Saberstrips, my Fresnel (a Hollywood spotlight I converted to a strobe) and my 69″ Elinchrom I converted to a focusing rod modifier.

One of my v2.0 Saberstrips which uses a AD200 as the light.

The following images were all created with three v2.0 Saberstrips as shown in my photo above.

 

The following were shot with a backlight with a cone, three v2.0 Saberstrips and the Fresnel as a fill light.

And finally two v2.0 Saberstrips and the Fresnel as a key light.

For me experimenting with light is one of the most exciting parts of dance photography. Don’t be afraid to experiment, otherwise all of your images will begin to look the same. And what fun is that?

UPDATE October 12 2017

In my review of Cheetahstand’s Quick Stripbox and Lantern I have shown my lighting setups for a different dance troupe. You can view that post here.

Original Post

I was recently hired to do an annual studio dance session by one of my long time clients. I’m posting this to show how I use xPLOR, eVOLV, Cheetahstand, CononMark, etc lights and modifiers in a session. This was an all-day session lasting approximately 6.5 hours of nonstop shooting. I had charged both the Xplor and eVOLV lights to full the day before. I never even ran close to running out of battery power on any of the strobes. All of the strobes showed half full at the end of the day. My Canon 1DXII showed 25% battery life left at the end of the day to give you some reference. I was using the WFT-E6A wireless transmitting dongle on my camera to wirelessly tether my rig to my iPad so the client could view the images as they happened. Using the transmitter uses more battery life than without.

There seems to be quite a bit of ‘talk’ that certain brands of modifiers/lights/etc. must be used in order to ‘be a pro.’ Nonsense. How one uses gear, how one engages with the talent and how one uses their imagination are the most important part of imagery to my clients. So I post this in hopes that it will help other shooters who are interested in multi light set ups, but not hung up on brand names or scientific theories about what makes a true parabola or other talking points. When people ask me what is the one thing I would have for gear over everything else, I always say your imagination. Years ago I was blessed to be able to spend time with Annie Leibovitz and I asked her “How do I shoot more like you?” Her response? “Don’t shoot like me Mark, shoot like you. It’s the only way to develop your own style.”

I used a four light setup most of the day. My key light was the CononMark 120cm inverted octa using an xPLOR600 with a remote head. I opted to not use my Parabolix D35 because the size I needed for the day required a larger modifier. And I’ve been very happy with the quality of light from the Cononmark. My two rim lights are Cheetahstand Quick Strip lights using xPLOR600s and the top overhead light is an eVOLV200 mounted into an AD-B2 housing. The modifier is a Fresnel adjustable head. For dance I always use a 140″ wide seamless. In this case I’m using black to give a grittier look to the imagery.

I use children’s ABC flash cards to help me know what light is in what group.

The great thing about battery powered strobes is I can roll the key lights or others wherever they’re needed when I want a different look for light

I had to be creative in sandwiching my eVOLV200 against the ceiling!

Some of my final images.

  

13 Jan 2019

Saberstrip v2.0 – A REVOLUTIONARY modifier – Update January 13 2019

January 13 2019

I continue to be absolutely amazed at the flexibility and versatility of the v2.0 Saberstrips. As of this writing I do know that Scott has not yet offered these for sale to the general public. The reason I continue to post my findings here is in hopes of motivating some of you to contact him to ‘hurry him along‘ in the sale of these modifiers. In addition to dance, their form factor and quality of light make them invaluable in my tool kit. Seriously – combined with the AD200 strobes I feel they are a revolution in modifiers. Here are just a few of the in studio dance imagery created using these lights.

An AD200 is the strobe.

My general configuration of the v2.0 Saberstrips for this session. The converted Fresnel and the 69″ Elinchrom I have converted to a focusing rod modifier are actually used for FILL, not as key lights for this dance session.

  

Update November 19 2018

I continue to be so impressed how using two v2.0 Saberstrips can produce the light I so love which could only be created with a ring light. But the huge difference is since the lights are NOT attached to the camera, I can use a long lens, yet keep the lighting near the talent. This was taken with a Canon EF 85mm f1.2 lens. The versatility of these modifiers is incredible.

Not to mention my use of them in dance imagery creation.

Several of you have written to me asking when Scott will release these modifiers. I highly suggest you write to him on his website to ask. I continue to encourage him to release these modifiers.

Update October 14 2018

I recently conducted a studio dance session using three Saberstrip v2.0s combined with a Mole Richardson Fresnel spotlight I have converted to a strobe. I continue to be so amazed and impressed by the versatility and light quality of the second generation Saberstrips. As I’ve stated before I’m just scratching the surface of what can be accomplished with these remarkable lighting tools.

My general placement of the SS’s for the dance session. I am able to control on/off levels using my R2 controller. The ability to place the hair/rim light so close to the ceiling is remarkable.

Here you can see my general placement of the Fresnel spotlight which has been converted to a strobe which uses a Flashpoint 1200ws head.

Each of these images were created using a combination of Fresnel/Saberstrip light modifiers. 

Update September 17 2018

Yesterday I conducted an all day dance session. I found that utilizing three v2.0 Saberstrips with 3 Flashpoint AD200s produced remarkable light for studio dance. Rim lights, using two Saberstrips and one overhead light produced the exact mood I was trying to achieve. Seriously this combination is incredible for my dance work.

How I configured the Saberstrips for the dance session.

The results…

Update August 1 2018

I recently used the v2 Saberstrips in on location sessions in Seattle. Man I could not have done it without them! You can read about it here.

I have also completed a publicity shoot using two Saberstrips for a West Side Story publicity image as shown below.

Two v2 Saberstrips in parallel to the ground. I just love the look of this light configuration.

Original Post

Like most other folks and way before I began shooting as a full time pro, I had a day job. It was during this time I discovered a very unique light modifier called the SaberStrip. What was so intriguing to me is its shape and the quality of light it produces. I was a bit suspicious when I first received my Strip because it seemed like ‘just a high quality shipping tube’ with some rip stop nylon as the modifier’s cover. Also this was back in the day when I was almost exclusively using speed lights, but had two PCB Einsteins for my ‘studio work.’ And this was well before the advent of built in radio receivers in speed lights, so I had to use a pigtail cable connected to my speed light inside the tube to attach it to the Phottix Transmission receiver I was using at the time. A bit of a hassle, but it was the only thing that existed at the time, which was ‘high tech’ for that era.

Although I loved the quality of light it produced, for me the power or rather lack of power of the speed light relegated the Strip to my closet. I tried to fabricate my own ‘Strip’ for my Einsteins, but found out it was not as easy as I thought. So I basically gave up and moved on to other things.

In 2013 I decided to create a series of images about the hands of artists which included both performing as well as creating artists. Since I wanted to shoot the talent in their natural environments I found that all of my ‘normal’ modifiers would not work well due to space. In some cases I had literally 10 inches or less to place a light and modifier to light the talent! So as I was rummaging through my gear closet I happened upon my Strip that I had doomed to its lonely existence in the back of my modifier closet. Eureka! That’s the perfect tool for this job and since most of the venues I was shooting in were very small I would not need a ton of light power so my speed light would do just fine.

By happenstance the Director of the Peninsula Museum of Art saw one of my images and asked to see the rest. She then asked if I’d consider having a solo exhibit at the museum the following year. I politely told her no and when she inquired as to the reason for my decision I simply replied “I don’t think my work is good enough for a museum and I think it would be very narcissist to do that.” She simply smiled and said OK. Later one of the artist I know mentioned that he had heard I was offered a solo museum exhibit but turned it down. Werner asked me if I ever go to museum exhibits to which I responded “Why yes, I love going, why?” His response was typical Werner, direct and to the point; “Well quit being so fucking selfish and let others enjoy and be inspired by what you’ve created Mark!” I’m seldom if ever at a loss for words but I had nothing to say. So I contacted the Director and agreed to display my work which I titled “29 Hands, 15 Artists.” With the exception of one of the images, all were lit with my Strip and a speed light.

Fast forward to today, 2018 and I was made aware of SaberStrip’s v2.0 version of the Strip which accepts an eVOLV200! In March 2018 I was shipped two advanced copies of the modifiers to test to see if I could offer any feedback. Here’s what I’ve found so far:

The 200 is inserted into the bottom of the modifier through what I call the “Tractor Tire” the designer fabricated it to attach the 200. I believe his design is to offer strength to the mount. I simply like to think he liked Tonka Trucks as a kid! The knurled knob on the left in this photo is the turning knob that screws the 200 in place. The other nice design feature is you can eject the battery of the 200 without removing it from the modifier, a very thoughtful design element.

Sorry for the shitty camera phone blurry image. The red thing you see at the top of this shot indicates that the screw is NOT attached to the 200 which is a very nice feature. One of the things that I found to be a design issue, it’s very easy to over tighten the screw. There’s no need to do so because it makes it VERY difficult to unscrew the unit from the mount. I learned the hard way and had to use a screwdriver and hammer to loosen the screw.

It’s also not possible to let the eVOLV slide down into the tube because there are ribs on the interior which keeps the strobe from sliding too far into the unit. I believe he may have other plan since those interior ribs seem to be reinforcements for four exterior metal nipples. Barn door or grid accessories for the future? Perhaps.

I painted a directional arrow on the housing to indicate which direction to loosen the mounting screw.

What the interior looks like in the v2.0 Strip. You can see the reinforcing supports which prevent the eVOLV from sliding too far into the tube.

Although most people will not have to do this, I ground down the mounting peg that is cast into the housing. This allows me to easily insert the peg into female mounts I use to place the modifier in either a vertical or horizontal position. Although the v2.0 Strip works extremely well in stands which offer the mounting peg to be in a vertical or horizontal position, not all light stands offer that option. When I travel to other cities I often have to rent stands and not all rental houses have adjustable spigot locations on their stands.

This is why I needed to shave down the diameter of the molded peg. It would not fit as cast. I find these female spigots invaluable in my gear bag.

I plan to use these to mimic a ‘ring light’ because I can now leave the modifier and strobe very close to the talent and back away to shoot with a long lens. Not possible with traditional ring lights. Also since the eVOLVS have modeling lights in the Fresnel head I now have a modeling light in this configuration. Sure, not brightest modeling light, but way better than none.

My first test was with Bob outdoors for a ring light style lighting test.

Canon 1DXII EF135 lens ISO 100 both AD200s set at 1/8 power. 1/5000th f2.0

Canon 1DXII EF135 lens ISO 100 both AD200s set at 1/8 power. 1/8000th f2.0

In those instances where I want to place the v2.0 Strip close to the ground I will simply use a Godox S bracket as a base. This configuration will be perfect for dance shoots as fill lights or anytime you wish to place the units very low onto a flat surface.

Comparison

  SaberStrip v1.0 SaberStrip v2.0 w/2 eVOLVS and SS
Light Flashpoint Zoom R2 Evolv200  
Flash weight 17 oz 31 oz  
Power level Full Full  
Distance to Sekonic 5 feet 5 feet  
Shutter Speed 1/100th 1/100th  
Aperture f5.6 f11 f13
Time to Recycle 6.8 sec 1.57 sec  
Length of fabric 29″ 29″  
Width of fabric 2.25″ 2.25″  
Length of modifier 38.5″ 34.75″  
Diameter of modifier 3.5″ 3.5″  
Saberstrip Weight 19 oz 27 oz  

For me the most significant stats are the recycle time and power. It’s the very reason I stopped using my original speed light Strip, it just lacked power. And in my work a one second delay feels like 12 years. Human expressions change in a nanosecond and invariably it’s the money shot I wanted, but missed because the strobe was recycling. Two full stops and five seconds faster in recycle time makes this modifier an incredible tool.

The ‘tube’ freely rotates around the mount so it can easily and conveniently turn the fabric to any position needed. There’s also a very small 1/4 inch 20 screw hole in the ‘tractor tire’ housing. I’m not sure why the guy put one there but it’s damn convenient. I plan to place a female mounting stud in there so I can either mount the Strip with the built in male stud or a female one. It should be noted that if you place a long ¼ 20 screw into that hole it will stop the free rotation of the tube. So IF you are the anal type and want to lock down the tube’s rotation you can do that with this screw hole.

This coming weekend I have three personal project shoots and I plan to test the light quality and applications in those sessions. I’m not sure how many times the Strip v2.0 will be my key light, but now that the recycle times and the power available through this meets my needs I’m sure it will always be in my bag.

Having a stand, a strobe and a modifier all in one easy to transport package is great for run and gun shooting, especially outside in moderate to high wind. My preferred stand for these is the Neewer Light Stand, 114 inches/290 centimeters Stainless Steel Heavy Duty with 1/4-inch to 3/8-inch Universal Adapter. It has a removable spigot that can be configured for either a vertical or horizontal female mount which is perfect for the new Strips. They are well made, strong and inexpensive.

The number of ways to mount the Strip seems endless. My current favorite grip mount for the Strip is the Matthews Mini Grip Head. I modified it by drilling out one of the holes to 9/16th of an inch which fits the Strip’s 5/8th inch stud.

What I like:

  • High quality Construction
  • Built in male mounting stud
  • Ability to rotate the modifier around two axis
  • Accepts the Evolv200
  • Well balanced, having the strobe at the mounting end of the modifier
  • Very wind resistant
  • Will fit into very tight spaces

Improvements

  • Male stud needs to be the 5/8th inch size standard of all spigots
  • Wheel that attaches the strobe needs to have directional arrows.
  • Wheel needs to prevent over tightening

During the weekend of April 21st 2018 I had my first opportunity to use the v2 Sabers in studio. I wanted to determine if paring them in a horizontal way would give me the ring light type of affect. I’ve always loved the look of a ring light shot, but have been frustrated that the distance of the light to the talent is limited by the focal length of my lens. Using my ring light further away to compress the talent’s face meant that the light is also further away, causing a harsher look. But using two Strips horizontal to the ground with the ability to adjust the distance between them allows me to leave the light source close to the talent, yet move further back to use a longer focal length. Having my cake and eating it too is wonderful!

The images below show how this worked on Jessica and I’m very happy with the results. Shot with a 135mm prime lens.

The flexibility of being able to angle the pitch of the Strips and distance between them is wonderful. More control than a ring light. As a fill/rim light I have not experienced a better modifier. Reflectors make great fill or rim light modifiers, but I have always preferred strobes for that task. It allows me finer control of my fill light.

By changing the angle of the top Strip in the image of Jess with her arm above her head I am able to cast a bit of a shadow on her eyes while filling in under her eyes to prevent shadows. That flexibility allows me to create nuance shadow/highlights with the Strips.

Here I am using the Strips as a fill and rim light. All of these images are three light shots. My 10” Fresnel is the key light, a gobo modifier is used on a light to create pattern on the background and the Strip is used as a fill/rim light.

The control of the Strip as a fill light is quite lovely and can be used as subtle or as bold as you wish. Here are two more images I created using two SS’s in parallel as a ‘ring light’ but in my view with a much better result.

Erica is 50+ and just the use of a shallow DOF and the two SS lights produced this image WITHOUT the use of Photoshop.

Two SaberStrips v2.0

Three SaberStrips v2.0

Oh and large groups in moderate to strong wind? I was recently at a client to cover the high school musical awards and prior to the event kids assemble outside. It’s often a fun place to get group shots before the show. The issue is always crowded sidewalks and of course crazy high school kids. I shot this image with ONE SS and one eVOLV200 at HALF POWER. 

1/100th f5.0 ISO100, SS v2 is the modifier and the strobe is the AD200 set to half power. Can you say incredible? It’s crazy.

I recently visited Luna Cycle in El Segundo to do some documentary photography of the staff. In the vast majority of cases the SS were used due to their flexibility and light quality. As in my 29 Hands Exhibit I was able to use the SS to light the talent in places where it would be almost impossible to fit a modifier in the space I had available and achieve a quality of light I wanted. Below is an example of one of the shots.

This is the ‘natural light’ scene where I was to photograph one of the young ladies who performs logistics for Luna Cycle.

Removing some of the boxes and shooting the light through the bookcase produced the image and quality of light I was after.

My apologies as I know you won’t be able to ‘unsee’ the image that follows, but to date it illustrates the rim lighting capabilities of the Strip. During this session I was to shoot two Drag Queens. The fella on the left is 6-1 without heels and with his 4” heels it makes him 6-5! I used the Strip as a rim light and if you notice the illumination from head to toe it’s quite remarkable. Could this be accomplished with a gridded light? Of course it could. But due to the very slim shape of the Strip it allowed me to get as close to the back drape as possible keeping spill to a minimum and certainly much less than a softbox without a grid.

Outdoors with the Strip is quite good. It is ‘almost’ impervious to wind, high wind. It is more wind resistant than my go to outdoor modifier, the PCB Omni. The disadvantage is since the Strip uses the AD200 it is a full stop less powerful than the AD600 I use with the Omni or my Aputure Fresnel head. But to circumvent that disadvantage I often use two Strips as a key light when outdoors. And in those instances where I want a very large light source I use three Strips configured in a Y shape. I find it’s the equivalent to a 45” octa with 600ws of power. Ever use something that size out in moderate or high wind? And I use all three on a single stand.

My partner recently conducted a head shot session using two of the Strips. She used one as the key and the other as a rim light. It was very windy under the concrete bridge where she was shooting and the Strips barely wobbled. The light quality is excellent and easily replicated her preferred modifier, a Glow 36” Octa. But in that kind of wind, especially the gusts that occurred an octa would have been quite the handful. She does prefer the catch light of the octa, a personal preference to which many people may agree. I happen to feel that round catch lights are the default, yet in natural light a catch light is anything but round…..

As you can see the quality of light produced by the Strip is excellent. Two lights, both Strips. One as the key light the other as a rim light.

Is it the perfect modifier? Nope, but as of right now there is no perfect modifier. Just like there’s not a perfect camera, lens or person. Is it the most versatile modifier I currently own or use? YES! For me the v2 Saber Strips are revolutionary and I have not even scratched the surface of how they can be used. Thank goodness for the AD200 lights and Scott’s development to incorporate them into the Saber Strips! Scott has mentioned that the v2 versions which use the eVOLV200s will be available in late July 2018.

27 Nov 2018

LightSaver AD200 Flash Bumper – Update Novmeber 27 2018

Update November 27 2018

Because I’m a small business I always try to support other small businesses first before larger companies. I know how tough running your own show can be even given all of the advantages. As I was told long ago “You don’t get something for nothing.” which applies to situations well beyond paying for things. I had originally purchased and assessed the Lightsaver bumpers back in June of this year. To summarize what’s in my original review: I found it better than the Flashpoint Skins sold by Adorama in terms of padding, but didn’t like that the battery compartment was covered. 

I like to revisit sites of small businesses now and again to see if any improvements or new products are available. I was THRILLED to see that he has revised his bumpers to now include a battery compartment cut out!

Not only has he incorporated a battery compartment cut out, he’s notched the bumper for the released slider too! Very cool!

For those who follow this blog you will notice that I use new v2.0 Saberstrip modifiers with my AD200s. (Let’s hope Scott releases them for sale sometime soon!) Although it’s not my exclusive use of those strobes, they reside in those magic little tubes of delight 85% of the time. Which means that the ends of the strobes stick out from the modifiers, exposed. So I purchased two more of his bumpers to install on my AD200s.

Love his new colors too!

The bottom black bumper was my original purchase and you can see that I hacked the cover with my Xacto knife to make way for battery removal without having to remove the cover. But with his new design that’s all history! Hooray!

One of the side benefits of the bumpers is the ability to set the AD200 with the v2.0 Saberstrip flat on a hard surface. So often in dance sessions I use the SS’s as rim lights. The ability to just place them flat on the ground saves me hauling extra light stands too!

Being able to place the strobe and modifier flat on the ground without worry about wobble or damage is great.

An example of using rim lights on the ground with the v2.0 Saberstrips and AD200s.

In the past I’ve used a Godox S bracket to hold my v2.0 SS’s flat on the ground with AD200s and to protect the fragile screen from damage. 

Kudos to Lightsaver for taking the time to improve his design. I highly recommend his 20.00 solution to protect your AD200. Oh yeah, plus he’s a small biz like me!

Original Post June 6 2018

I purchased one of the LightSaver AD200 Flash Bumpers to determine if it offers more protection than the Flashpoint Silicone Skins which I have been using for the past year. I watched their demo video as they drop a protected AD200 from about five feet onto a carpeted floor. He was out of stock on all but his black units so I ordered the last one he had. It arrived on time and after installing the unit on my AD200 here are my observations:

The LightSaver is about two and a half times as thick as the Flashpoint Silicon Skin.

It lacks a cutout for the battery and I view that as a major oversight. I don’t want to remove the cover just to eject the battery

There is no cutout below the power switch to allow access to the micro USB port. Due to the thickness of the LightSaver it prevents accidental movement of the on/off switch. A nice additional feature.

I ended up using a X-Acto knife to cut out the battery compartment opening so I would not have to remove the cover to eject the battery.

Because the Silicon Skins precisely match the AD200s for fit and openings, I opted to cut one down to size to fit my needs. It’s not as thick as the LightSaver, but I don’t plan on dropping my units. But then again no one ever does! LOL

I always appreciate when anyone develops a product that addresses a need. And in the case of LightSaver I believe he’s done that….to a degree. But by not having cut outs for one of the major access points I utilize often makes it a no go (meaning not purchasing another one) again. At 25.00 listed on his main page (but 20.00 on his buy page…?) versus 9.95 for a Silicon Skin I’ll opt for the latter. Again it’s all about personal preference. And as far as dropping ANY gear it’s a risk we all take. My main plan is to sometimes rest my modifier/AD200 combo on the AD200 when I set it down. And the Skins do a fine job of protecting the units under those instances. 

17 Nov 2018

Flashpoint R2 Pro 2.4GHz Transmitter for Pentax (XPro-P) – Updated 11-17-18

Update November 17 2018

On a recent on location session in Seattle WA I encountered a situation where the R2Pro would NOT fire my strobes. I was in a club called The Triple Door to shoot publicity for my client’s upcoming performance for Rock of Ages. I had the room filled with haze for the session and the client wanted some shots with two of the stars in a booth. As I looked over I was blown away at the rays of light coming through the windows! The issue in obtaining the light rays just using natural light was the club is below street level and it was a cloudy day (Seattle! LOL) the sunlight was intermittently blocked by both pedestrians, vehicles and clouds. It was also late in the day so the angle of the rays of light would move quite a bit. 

I had my partner go outside with both a 600Pro and an AD200, both with cones attached. My thought was that using a strobe through the windows would produce the same light I was experiencing with the natural sunlight, but not blocked by clouds or people passing by. Yet even in complete line of sight for test shots the strobes would NOT fire. I can only surmise that the combination of concrete, brick, the wiring in the club and my lower elevation to the strobes prevented the radio signals from reaching the strobes. And yes I tried both the 0-30 and 0-100 distance choices on the R2Pro. The distance from where I was to the strobes was about 35 feet and 15 feet below.

In this shot you can see some of the natural rays of sunlight coming through the window. You can also see the lower elevation I was at since the club is below street level. My partner was standing to the very left of the bike with the strobes. I even went to the booth behind the talent and could see my partner when I attempted to fire the strobes to no avail. Obviously the strobe I had inside fired well which was my key light for the shot.

I always test my gear before putting it into workflow and did so with the R2 for the Pentax. But in this particular situation the radio signals would not reach the lights. Keep my experience in mind for your own sessions. I am NOT not recommending the R2 transmitters. Both my Canon and Pentax R2s have performed well. It’s just in this situation the R2 Pentax did not make a connection in this specific situation…..strange.

Original Post

FINALLY! I was thrilled when the R2 Pro for the Pentax was announced! As some of you who follow my blog know, I’ve done a workaround for the 1/125th max sync speed for my Pentax 645Z which can be found here. The short version is I was using a Cactus v6II trigger combined with older Godox USB plug in receivers. It worked fine, but like all workarounds it had limitations. That’s all over now with the R2 Pro for the Pentax! Yay!

So I just did some testing to determine if the trigger works with the 645Z and just as important if any banding occurs with the trigger. You see, I had originally purchased a MBX1000 Priolite when the Z was first released. At that time it was the ONLY strobe that would perform HYPERSYNC with the Z rather than HSS. I found that in addition to being quite expensive, the Priolite produced a gradient in the image similar to using a graduated neutral density filter which I found to be unacceptable for such an expensive strobe. Sure it could be corrected in post, but why should I have to do that with an expensive strobe?

All that is over now and here are my test shots I conducted with the R2 Pro for the Pentax:

The native light and setup. I’m using an eVOLV200 in a Saberstrip v2.0. Strobe is set to 100% for all of the following shots.

1/1600th f2.8 ISO 100

1/4000th f2.8 ISO 100. You can clearly see that there is NO BANDING when using HSS!

I could NOT use an eVOLV200 inside of the Saberstrip v2.0 because the USB port was covered when inserted into the SS. But since I no longer need a USB receiver I can now use my Pentax with these remarkable modifiers. I have not tested the trigger with the other xPLOR600s and 600Pros I own, but I have no doubt it will work well. If I find there are issues, then I will post them here in this short review. I have an upcoming client session on location where I now plan to use the Pentax and the new trigger.

A final note. Formerly while using my Canon R2 Pro attached to the 645Z (when not using HSS), pressing the shutter did not reactivate the R2 Pro after it went into sleep mode like it does on my Canon gear. I had to manually press a button on the R2ProC to wake it from sleep mode. Of course there were times I forgot to do so and missed a shot. Not so with the new Pentax R2 Pro. Now when I press the shutter it wakes the transmitter from sleep mode.

Thank you thank you thank you for producing a HSS trigger for Pentax!!!!

30 Oct 2018

Xplor/Godox600, eVOLV200 and Pentax 645Z, HSS!!! Updated 10-30-18

Update October 30 2018

No need to do this workaround anymore. Flashpoint has released their new Flashpoint R2 Pro 2.4GHz Transmitter for Pentax. You can read my findings here.

Update September 26 2018

I am preparing for a publicity shoot where I want to use my 645Z, so I had to remind myself how to shoot HSS with the method I explain below. A spider had built a cool web in my backyard so I had this crazy notion to use my eVOLV200 with the Pentax. BTW Flashpoint will be releasing the Flashpoint R2 Pro 2.4GHz Transmitter for Pentax (XPro-P) which will allow HSS without all the shenanigans I went through to make it happen. I sent this shot to a friend of mine who hate spiders. Now she’s not talking to me….LOL!!!!

EXIF 1/1000th f4.5 ISO 100.

UPDATE February 16 2018

I have confirmed that the new Flashpoint/Godox AD600 Pro works in HSS with the Pentax 645Z as explained below.

UPDATE September 8 2017

In my post about the Parabolix 35D I have some of my recent client work which was just released. All of those images were shot using HSS with my 645Z.

UPDATE August 31 2017

A visitor recently asked if the older AD360 line of strobes achieve HSS with a Pentax 645Z based on the method I describe below in my original article. The answer is YES it does. Rather than just ‘say yes’ under an ‘assumption’ that it would I decided to actually test it. I’m preparing for a dance session in two days and my partner who is making the move to all xPLOR/eVOLV units herself asked if she could borrow my old AD360s for the shoot. As a gift I had purchased an xPLOR TTL 600 for her so she wants to combine that with my old AD360s using my XTR-16 receivers. So a quick test before charging all of the units for her proves that the AD360 line works!

Pentax 645Z 1/1000th, f5.0, ISO 100. When using an older AD360 you need to manually set the strobe to HSS on the light itself. And if you’re going to ask me why I didn’t shoot this against a pure white seamless, I just did this as a courtesy to a reader. There’s no banding and if you want to see FOR YOURSELF, test it yourself.

UPDATE August 20 2017

I ran a test yesterday of various modifiers along with the new AD-B2 mount and discovered that when you are using the USB receivers in the eVOLV200s the only level of modeling light that can be activated on the AD-B2 is the lowest level from the FT-16 controller.

UPDATE: July 29 2017

I have just completed testing HSS with the eVOLV200 strobes with my Pentax 645Z. I have included my test shots with “Bob” and all Flashpoint USB triggers and Cactus v6II settings are the same as the Xplor/Godox 600 lights. But I have outlined how I set the eVOLV200 lights below.

All test shots with the eVOLV200 were shot at 1/2 power using the bare bulb head through a Fresnel modifer. It is necessary to disable all built in wireless receivers in the eVOLV200. The USB plug in receivers are necessary to make this work. You must also engage HSS using the button rather than depending on shutter speed on the remote to automatically engage HSS.

I’m using the ‘old’ 433mhz USB receivers along with the FT-16 transmitter. (see full setup in my Original test below)

Reference shot using only ambient light. The modifier I like to use is a Fresnel lens. It effectively replicates the look of sunlight.

1/500th f4.5 ISO 100 Pentax 645Z eVOLV200 at 1/2 power, bare bulb attachment.

1/1000th f4.5 ISO 100 Pentax 645Z eVOLV200 at 1/2 power, bare bulb attachment.

1/1600th f4.5 ISO 100 Pentax 645Z eVOLV200 at 1/2 power, bare bulb attachment.

1/2500th f4.5 ISO 100 Pentax 645Z eVOLV200 at 1/2 power, bare bulb attachment.

1/3200th f4.5 ISO 100 Pentax 645Z eVOLV200 at 1/2 power, bare bulb attachment.

1/4000th f4.5 ISO 100 Pentax 645Z eVOLV200 at 1/2 power, bare bulb attachment.

A few people contacted me to let me know they have been able to use HSS with a Pentax 645Z using other brands of lights with the Cactus v6II which I very much appreciated. But even though they have had HSS/645Z success with Profoto’s B1’s, Speedotrons, Photogenic Studio Max, etc. I wanted to make this work with the Flashpoint/Godox line of lights. Why? Well because for my work they fit my workflow with incredible innovation and the largest eco system of strobes. Using an xPLOR600 as either a monolight or pack/head system is just one reason. Combining two of them to make a single 1200 ws head when I need that power, creating their upcoming eVOLV200 twin head all combine to make it the line I love to use. I’ve had my fill of purchasing other strobes just for my 645Z, namely Priolites to achieve HSS. Now I no longer have to use separate brands of lights to do my commercial work no matter what brand of camera I’m using for the job at hand. And that’s great since I use three different brands of cameras!

Thank you to Cactus for developing a tool that is both remarkable and functional. It’s been a godsend for my work.

Original Test Review

Flashpoint R1 Flashpoint Commander Transmitter

To put it simply HALLELUJAH!!!! Oh my gosh for the past four years I have wanted with all of my want to have an option for HSS and my Pentax 645Z other than my MBX1000 Hotsync Priolites. Priolites do NOT use HSS, but rather hypersync and as the shutter speed increases the slight shading of banding increases as well. I’m not talking about black bars, but what looks like a graduated neutral density filter was applied to the image. Sure I could remove it in those instances where it’s obvious, but in my mind for $2600.00 per light it should NOT be something I have to do. Anyway there are several other issues that bothered me, but as ‘the only game in town’ for shutter speeds over 1/125th of a second when using strobes, I like other shooters was stuck. Ricoh never manufactured modern leaf shutter lenses for the 645 and based on their current financial situation and market share I seriously doubt they will. Plus leaf shutter lenses are expensive and limited to whatever focal length is produced. It’s one of the limits that smug shooters of Phase One or Hassy bring up when talking about the 645Z. I just laugh and now I snicker…

So here’s how I figured it out. I now use a Flashpoint R1 Flashpoint Commander Transmitter with older 433mgh USB receivers in my Xplor/Godox 600 strobes. The FT16 is placed on top of a Cactus v6II transceiver. And as you can see by the shots I’ve displayed below it’s a godsend. Will I miss 1000ws from my Priolite? Oh hell no, not when I can simply combine two Xplor600s and hook them to my 1200ws head. HSS using my beloved Xplor600 with my Pentax 645Z means Christmas came in July 2017 for me this year! Hallelujah!!!

How the scene looked in mid day Bay Area sunlight. That’s my buddy “Bob” who fills in for my tests.

One of my trusty USB receivers plugged into my Xplor 600

All radio signals turned off and HSS enabled. You MUST physically enable HSS on the strobe to make this work. The quarter power is just what I selected for the test. And yes you can use any power level you want.

On the Cactus v6II set the Camera System to Pentax.

On the Cactus v6II set the Flash System to Manual Flash.

The Flashpoint R1 Flashpoint Commander Transmitter goes on top of the Cactus.

1/500th f4.5, ISO100 Xplor600 at 1/4 power.

1/1000th f4.5, ISO100 Xplor600 at 1/4 power.

1/1600th f4.5, ISO100 Xplor600 at 1/4 power.

1/2500th f4.5, ISO100 Xplor600 at 1/4 power.

1/3200th f4.5, ISO100 Xplor600 at 1/4 power.

1/4000th f4.5, ISO100 Xplor600 at 1/4 power. That’s the 645Z’s max shutter speed.

A pulled back shot of the scene at 1/4000th f4.5, ISO100 Xplor600 at 1/4 power.

Will I like it if Cactus develops a firmware update for their triggers so that I don’t have to use the USB receivers? Sure! It would also mean I could use my eVOLV200s with my 645Z too. But for now I’m damn happy to have figured out how to use my 600s in HSS with my 645Z. No shaded banding whatsoever using my Xplor/Godox strobes.

I truly am one happy person!

25 Oct 2018

Converting a Mole Junior 412 Fresnel – UPDATED 10-25-18

Update October 25 2018

I recently conducted a studio session using my Mole Richardson Fresnel. I continue to be impressed with the quality of light it produces along with the versatility of focusing.

The Fresnel in it’s fully flooded position.

Fully flooded as the key light camera right. Gobo behind the talent with haze in the air. Not done in post but in studio.

Using it as a prop in one of the sessions.

Update October 14 2018

I was able to use my Mole Richardson Fresnel during a client dance session. I have been excited about using the Fresnel for dance since the light it throws is just delicious. I combined the Fresnel light with some Saberstrip v2.0 lights which use the Flashpoint eVOLV200s. In this case I just used a single xPLOR600 even though I have a 1200ws head in the Fresnel. I didn’t need the power of 1200ws for this job.

This is how I had set up for the dance sessions. I toggled lights on and off from my R2Pro trigger.

A portrait I created of Savage and Alison who are the teachers of the dancers. Fresnel is key light camera right. Saberstrip is my hair light.

I realize that many people chase ‘soft light’ but I have found that the light thrown by a Fresnel is more acceptable to my client base for quite a few types of sessions. For my blog post about the Saberstrip v2.0’s which I consider a revolutionary modifier I used in conjunction with the Mole Richardson, you can click here.

UPDATE May 14 2018

I recently conducted a client publicity session using my converted Mole Richardson 412.

Works well for close in head shots. Strobe in fully focused position.

Full body shot, strobe in fully flooded position.

UPDATE 4-21-18

I was finally able to run a session with both the converted Mole Richardson and my gobo light modifier where I use Rosco size B gobos. The Mole Richardson performed brilliantly. Since I was in studio I did not use both AD600s, but rather a single one. Barn doors were used along with a light modifier I am not allowed to display or mention. I used it as a fill for these shots.

Canon 1DXII ISO 100 1/250th f4.0

Canon 1DXII ISO 100 1/250th f4.0

Canon 1DXII ISO 100 1/250th f4.0

UPDATE 3-31-18

The final tweaks have been made to my now converted Mole Richardson Junior 412 2000w tungsten spotlight into a strobe. I have installed a Flashpoint 1200ws strobe head into the unit along with a 9″ reflector as well a diffusion bulb cover. I love the look large Fresnel lenses offer for light and plan to use this not only for portraits, but for dance. The modifications I’ve made allow me to convert the Fresnel BACK INTO a tungsten light. The design of the light is genius. By simply removing four machine screws the entire guts of the light simply drop out.

Simply removing the tungsten bulb, reflector mirror and power supply is all I had to do. Then I fabricated a mount and limiting arm to mount the 1200ws strobe head. The hole in the upper right allows me to push the connector through the box.

I covered the hole by using a garbage disposal rubber cover.

The Flashpoint 1200ws head. If I don’t need 1200ws I simply hook up one xPLOR600 strobe body. The 9″ reflector fits perfectly in the housing.

You can see the dual elements in the 1200ws bulb here. I have the head in the “Spot” or focused position in this shot.

To ensure the light is as smooth as possible I’ve installed a frosted glass cover over the 1200ws bulb.

On the front and back of the Fresnel are mechanical levers which allow me to move the light from Flood to spot. Here it is n the Flood position.

As you can see the light is now in the Spot position.

Here I wanted to see how sharp the shadows are produced by a Fresnel.

Testing the Mole Fresnel as the key light with a gobo for background pattern of light and an Aputure Fresnel for fill.

Bob without any fill light.

Bob with fill light from the Aputure Fresnel mated to an eVOLV200.

All done and ready for my first shoot. Total cost: 327.52 USD for a 10″ Fresnel that accepts a modern strobe.

UPDATE 3-29-18

I wanted to try the converted unit outdoors using the barn doors and HSS. Still more refinements, but I believe this will make a valuable tool in my lighting kit. Both images shot at 1/2500th f2.8 ISO160

600ws head being used.

Barn doors configured as a vertical slit. Fully flooded zoom position on the modifier.

Barn doors open wide as to not affect the light. Mid focused Fresnel. Love the ultra sharp shadows Fresnel lenses produce.

Original Post March 27 2018

I’ve been in love with the light a Fresnel throws. As a young man I marveled at Hollywood glamour portraits produces by film and Fresnel spotlights. I purchased and have used two Aputure 4.5″ Bowens mount Fresnel modifiers with much success. But I longed for a larger version of a Fresnel. So I researched models over 8″ in diameter. The only ones I could find were the Elinchrom FS30 and the Broncolor Flooter. 3k and 4.5k respectively in price. There are some new LED Fresnel lights that are great, but I wanted a strobe. So….

I purchased a used Mole-Richardson Junior 2K Fresnel Tungsten Light, 10″ Lens – 412 off of Craigslist and am converting it to accept a strobe. It’s going well and when the project is finished I’ll be posting how I did my conversion as well as some test shots. I’m excited to say the least as it’s going way better than I expected. I wanted to have the ability to switch from my 600ws head to my 1200ws head when needed. I love choices. One of the great design elements of this classic unit is the ability to switch it back to its native tungsten configuration. AND Mole Richardson sells a LED conversion kit that only takes four screws to install. The unit is designed so well. No wonder so many film studios used these things!

My total cost to convert it to accept a strobe including the cost of the unit? 315.00 including the barn doors! 

Focused

Flooded

23 Sep 2018

Seamless need not be boring!

Occasionally my clients ask that I shoot in front of seamless. Most of the time it is because they have a graphic artist add treatments to the shot. In other cases they don’t have the time or budget to go on location. Shooting in front of seamless is my least favorite type of shooting, but sometimes it’s necessary. In a recent studio publicity session for Noises Off the client asked that I shoot in front of white seamless due to actor scheduling issues preventing an on location shoot. In addition he conveyed to me that no graphic treatments would be added to the final image. The Director of the play sent me a photograph created in NYC by another theatre company for the same play, Noises Off. They had shot their publicity image on location. It conveyed the mood of the shot to me very well.

So my challenge was to recreate that mood in front of seamless. No room, no textures of walls, just plain white paper is all that I had. So after giving it some thought, I decided to combine three different light sources to create the shot within the Artistic Director’s confines, but give the Director the mood and story he desired. I asked that some furniture be used to create levels between the seven (yep 7) different characters in the shot. It would also provide a much less sterile feeling of the seamless. A chair, a small table and I opted to bring a prop lamp I had purchased from a theatre company long ago.

So here’s what I used to create this final image:

Testing my speedlight/Fong concept at home in the lamp before using it on the client’s shoot. I wanted to ensure I could balance the light with ambient light.

Setting up the ‘room’ with the lights and props. The talent found this very entertaining to see me flashing the lamp and gobo strobes while all of this was going on! LOL

It was at this point I opted to change from my Glow Grand Para with focusing rod to the PLM 86″ I was not content with the light I was getting for this session with the Grand. Right tool for the right job is my motto.

Key Light was a PCB legacy 86” Soft silver umbrella. I had intended to use my Glow Grand Para focusing rod modifier, but found that PCB worked much better for this shot. Camera left was its placement. I cannot vouch for the newer version of the PLM soft silver umbrella as I have not purchased or used one. The strobe I used for the key light was the Flashpoint 600.

Here you can see that I started off using the Grand Para. I use my Pentax 645Z for all of my publicity work.

 

Here you can see that I’ve switched from the Grand Para to the PLM 86″. In the lower part of this shot you can see that I always shoot tethered to my iPad so my clients can see the shots in real time. Saves a lot of time.

The lamp was lit using a Flashpoint Zoon R2 Manual Flash with a Gary Fong Lightsphere placed inside the lamp shade. Because I was using strobes, any normal light bulb would have been completely overpowered so I needed to illuminate the lamp with a strobe. It just added the authenticity of light that I wanted for the shot.

The ‘window shadow’ I decided to add was created using a Flashpoint XP600 Pro attached to a Flashpoint XP600 Pro Portable 600ws Extension FlashHead using a now discontinued Bowens Universal Spotlite Attachment with a Rosco window gobo. I wanted some visual interest and a cue to the interior of a grand room to add mood.

Just one of the best aspects of the new 600Pro is the intensity of the modeling light. Because of this I am able to accurately place the gobo light without any issues. As you can see I have the remote 600Pro head attached to the 600Pro on the lightstand. It acts as a great ballast weight too! I do wish the cord on the 600Pro remote head was longer…. It’s shorter than the 600 remote head.

Part of the story of the shot is the ‘butler’ dumping a tray of appetizers on one of the other characters. So in order to time the shot, I asked the ‘butler’ to nod when he was about to dump the tray. The tumbling of the items off of the tray was not done in post, but in camera. It’s just my workflow.

As professional shooters we are so often asked to create a mood and story out of nothing. It’s just the nature of the job. Using your imagination and different light sources/modifiers can do things that one can only imagine.

27 Aug 2018

Testing Before Using

I know that I often state whenever I get a new modifier/strobe/etc. I ALWAYS test them BEFORE putting them into my workflow. I’ve had a suggestion arise lately about showing them in a group in addition to in each of my modifier/strobe posts. Sounded like a good idea so here we go, but I have no plans to make this post comprehensive for all of my tests. Just a few. The first covers the Saberstrip v2.0 that utilizes the Flashpoint eVOLV200s.

Saberstrip v2.0

Sometimes I use them in a triangle, sometimes just two parallel to the ground. Replicates a ring light, but with the ability to back away using a long lens to compress the talent.

Test using a triangle configuration.

Test using them in a pair.

The Glow EZ Lock

Test setup.

Mole Richardson Fresnel Conversion

Bought this 1965 MGM Studios MR 412 Fresnel and converted it from a 1000 watt constant tungsten light into a strobe Fresnel. The following images were all shot AS TESTS prior to putting the Fresnel into my workflow.

Parabolix 35D

Elinchrom 39″ Deep Rotalux 

 

I NEVER place anything into my toolkit unless I’ve tested it previously. Too many unexpected situations come up in any session. Being unprepared with things you KNOW about is not wise.

02 Aug 2018

Evolv200s, Xplor600s, 600Pro, Saberstrip v2s on location

People always get so nervous when they see how I hold my cameras! I hate straps. LOL!!!

Shooting as a pro means there are times when you have to prove yourself once again with an established client. Not doing a great job either in the finished product or through your service simply means you’re not used again. One of my long standing clients, Village Theatre recently changed Artistic Directors. Jerry Dixon, their new AD planned to attend two of the three on location publicity shoots all to be held in different cities in greater Seattle area. The first session for the play Curious Incidents is also the play he is directing. No pressure eh? LOL

The second aspect of this day that is always a bit concerning was that I NEVER SAW ANY OF THE VENUES IN ADVANCE of the day! Sure the Marketing Director sent me some camera phone photos and links to the MOPOP (Museum of Pop Culture) areas where she wanted to shoot, but I had never been there. Nor had I been to Spangler Book Exchange/Reread Books, the quaint bookstore where we were to shoot the Matilda publicity or the alley in Everett where I’d shoot the Howard Barnes publicity. Add to that the additional element of time. For each venue we were limited in time based on either the schedule of some of the talent or due to the venue’s prior commitments.

The only element I ever insist on from clients is to answer; “What is the mood you want from each session?” Why? Well because the expression of the talent(s) and the LIGHT is something I have to plan for BEFORE I hit the job….which leads me to….

The Marketing Director kept asking me “Mark, I need to know your power requirements for each venue so I can work with each of the operations managers to plan power for your gear.” Since I exclusively use Flashpoint strobes, guess what….they need no outside power!!! SCORE! I hauled seven, yes seven strobes from SF to SEA in a small Pelican case. 49.5 pounds…just UNDER the 50 lbs. limit! Three Xplor600s, one 600Pro and three Evolv200s! I split the four 600 batteries between me and my partner’s carry on camera bags instead of inside checked luggage to save weight (btw I always put gaff tape over the contacts of the batteries just in case…). All of the stands were rented in Seattle and for the smoke I advance shipped smoke grenades to the Marketing Director. It takes planning folks….LOL

For modifiers I took three v2 Saberstrips which use Evolv200s with their Fresnel heads. I cannot speak highly enough about both the Evolvs and the new Saberstrips. Together they create what I view as a revolutionary combination in camera lighting. Yeah they’re that good. I knew that both the MOPOP and the bookstore sessions would be VERY CRAMPED in terms of space. Using “traditional” modifiers or strobes would be a total pain in the ass. Sure it could be done, but would easily have been a 10/10 on my cussing scale. I knew I wanted a softer light for both the MOPOP and bookstore feeling, but a hard light in the alley. So I took three Fresnel modifiers for that session. All of my modifiers fit into my SKB hard sided golf case which I use to transport my light modifiers when traveling out of town.

So here’s how it all worked: (All of the BTS images are by my partner Tracy Martin)

Session 1, Curious Incident shoot at MOPOP

The Marketing Director wanted an image in MOPOP where the talent appears to be ‘inside’ a dream. So placing modifiers INSIDE this structure for the style of light I wanted to achieve would have been next to impossible without the Evolv200 and the v2 Saberstrip.

One of the final images before editing.

Using the Evolv200 and the Saberstrip to create the feeling of an overhead light source WITHOUT the need for a boom arm is wonderful. Almost all of the other modifiers I own would need to be tilted at an angle to face toward the ground without a boom arm. The Key light is a the Explor600 Pro with a Fresnel head modifier to my right next to the tower structure.

Final shot. Balancing the light to not overpower the hand held flashlight was key for this image. Had I only used the Fresnel pointing at the talent it would not give the impression of an overhead light which was key to this shot.

Session 2 for Matilda at ReRead Bookstore

About 20 people were in this tiny quaint bookstore just for this shoot! I think the actual customers were highly entertained. (They were taking iPhone photos of us! LOL) Here the Marketing staff and the talent review some of the images on my iPad.

Marketing looks over the shots in real time. As you can see the Saberstrip was invaluable in this session. Soft light, yet so good in tight spaces! I love it!!!

Jerry the AD attends to the details. I feel we made a great team since I sometimes miss the small but so important details when I’m in a session.

Ah I cannot say enough about the value of the Evolv200s paired with the v2 Saberstrips!!!!

A few of the Final Images

Session 3 for Howard Barnes in an alley in Everett WA

I laughed as I watched people walking by! They had no idea what to make of what was going on. Oh and that puppet freaked me out!

The Director of Howard Barnes is my light test fella. This is the alley in ‘natural light.’

The talent just yucking it up while I balance the smoke lights. Oh and if you’ve ever worked with smoke it’s great when there’s no wind…..LOL

A few of the Final Images

So cool that wind was coming up from that ground grate so her tail would fly!

Four Xplor600s and two Evolv200s lit this shot. Whew!

I was so shocked to see an article written by James Spangler the owner of ReRead Books where we shot the Matilda publicity! All if not most photographers know that getting feedback is rare so this was both a nice and humbling surprise. My whole point on this post is to highlight the incredible leap in technology and innovation in the field of photographic lighting. Sure all of us can figure out how to do something even if it’s tough. But to have others who are helping to ease the stress of creating beautiful light is wonderful!

02 Jun 2018

Flashpoint Godox AD600Pro – UPDATED June 2 2018

UPDATE June 2 2018

I installed the optional rear handle onto the Pro and love it. Being able to use the handle to adjust the angle of the strobe when it’s on a stand is so welcomed. Even though I often use a focusing rod modifier I do NOT like to use the rod as a lever to angle the strobe, so I simply hold the modifier to adjust the angle. There is one issue with the item I received. In order to install the handle you must remove the four Allen head bolts and use the longer ones which are supplied. I received two hex wrenches and I originally thought that they were different sizes, but they are the same. The issue is they both are TOO LARGE to remove or install the bolts. Luckily I have a huge tool supply and had the correct size of hex key. The supplier should investigate whether I just received an anomaly pack or if they’ve spec’d the wrong hex key.

Neither of the supplied hex keys fits the corresponding bolts.

The second issue is more of an annoyance than an actual issue. After I installed the handle the Pro would not fit into the cool little case that comes with the unit. Sad, I really like that case…sigh! But more importantly even with the handle installed it still fits nicely into my Pelican Case which is the one I use for airline transport. I recommend the handle, especially when a heavy modifier is mounted to the Pro.

The handle is really solid once installed and fits perfectly with the unit.

Too long to fit into its native case…sad!

Gladly it still fits into my Pelican case with the handle installed. You can see how much longer it is than the xPLOR600.

UPDATE April 4 2018

My client has just released the press imagery for Hunchback of Notre Dame so I am now able to share them. The session was held on location in Seattle at the Volunteer Park Water Tower which is four stories. After obtaining the required permits we had to lug all of the grip and lighting gear up four stories and I HATE LUGGING! LOL… Because the remote head was not yet available I didn’t use any focusing arms for this session. My modifiers of choice were the Elinchrom 69″ Octa and the SMDV 110cm octa. I used the 600Pro in the Eli and an xPLOR600 in the SMDV.

The four story water tower. We shot at the top for most of the session.

Boy how I wanted an escalator! LOL!!!!

The 600 Pro inside the Eli 69″ octa. Pentax 645Z shot at HSS.

The 600 Pro inside the Eli 69″ octa. Pentax 645Z shot at HSS.

The 600 Pro inside the SMDV 110cm octa. Pentax 645Z shot at HSS.

The 600 Pro inside the Eli 69″ octa. Pentax 645Z shot at HSS.

Toughest shot, natural light with the 645Z.

The talent, hair, makeup, wardrobe and marketing team. The 600 Pro inside the Eli 69″ octa. Pentax 645Z shot at HSS.

UPDATE March 15 2018

During recent client sessions, both of which were on location I had the opportunity to use the AD600 Pro in combination with a number of modifiers. Because the remote head for the Pro is not yet released I did not use any focusing rod modifiers. In one session whose images I cannot at this time, I used the Pro in an Elinchrom 69″ Octa with both diffusion panels installed. I did not go over 1/4 power and was shooting HSS with my Pentax 645Z. The unit performed flawlessly.

In the session I can post images below I used the Pro in a SMDV 44″ (110cm) octa with both diffusion panels installed. The interior of the theatre where I was doing these portraits was very dark so I appreciated the very bright modeling light so that I could easily obtain focus. To date I’ve found the Pro model exemplary in recycle time, modeling light and ease of use.

Waiting for the talent. It looks much brighter in this phone camera image than it actually appeared in real life!

Pro with SMDV 110cm camera left. Just out of frame camera right is my Sunbounce Mini reflector using the white side.

Pro with SMDV 110cm modifier directly in front of the talent. I’m shooting from below the modifier with the Sunbounce reflector under her face just out of frame.

 UPDATE: February 21 2018

Yesterday I was able to utilize the Pro during a commercial session. Here are my observations:

  • The modeling light is VERY bright, as bright as my former Einstein strobes.
  • IF I use the modeling light at any power that enables the fan, the battery life is much shorter than the AD600. My session was only three hours and at the end of it I had only one bar left on power. Keep in mind that I was using the modeling light at 100% during the entire session. The strobe only went to sleep after 30 minutes of non use. I will need to experiment with power control on this unit, i.e, modeling light, sleep time, etc.
  • The swivel mechanism is MUCH MORE ROBUST and far easier to adjust than the AD600. I tend to adjust the position of my lights often and in incremental steps during my sessions and the ability to pivot the modifier is excellent. Not having a ratcheting mechanism makes all the difference.
  • The recycling times are extraordinary. Literally no waiting for the strobe to recycle IF you’re not using 1:1 power. One second can seem like a lifetime when I’m shooting, but I seldom use 1:1 in rapid shooting. Normally in studio I’m at power levels of 1/32 to 1/2 at the most. I’m not a “spray and pray” shooter so when I say that I shoot at will, it’s when I see a gesture or expression that I want. And at those power levels it allows me to shoot at will.
  • Because the unit swivels so freely I will purchase the optional handle when it’s released. Although I plan to use the Pro with focusing arm modifiers and can use those to pivot the strobe, I’d prefer to use the handle.

That’s it for now. I used the Pro with the Adorama 65″ Glow Easy Lock X-Large Deep Beaded Silver Fiberglass Umbrella. Incredible modifier which I’m finding can rival my focusing arm modifiers in some instances!

Original Article

I debated waiting to write an entire review of my experience using the new Flashpoint Godox AD600Pro strobe until I had tested most of the items important to me. Because this is my high season it would take me about six months to do a soup to nuts review. So I’m opting to write my findings piecemeal meaning – as I go along. Sorry, but I felt it best to do it this way for this strobe. As I integrate the unit into my workflow I will make mental notes and add my findings to this review. 

Also since I almost exclusively use focusing arm modifiers now, I probably won’t have extensive use of the Pro until the remote head is released.

Things that are immediately apparent as improvements over the Flashpoint Godox AD600 units:

  • The swivel adjustment is nice and smooth now. No more ratcheting which I hated and modified on my units.
  • The modeling light is B R I G H T and adjustable to the output of the strobe. Like my old Einsteins. Love that
  • The swivel mount now allows you to place the unit in a vertical (parallel to the light stand) position using a SuperClamp and a stud.
  • I like the power button located on the bottom of the unit rather than the side. When I pack my strobes into my Pelican cases I often worry about the units turning on due to the pressure from the foam pads. So I always detach the batteries which airlines don’t like in checked luggage. Also simply pressing the power button now turns to unit off immediately. I like that. You must hold the power button down for 2-3 seconds to power the unit up.
  • The Bowens mount seems much more snug than the AD600. But that depends on the modifier too.

Some people ‘may’ feel that the build quality is ‘better’ on the Pro but I never thought the AD600 exhibited poor build quality….except for the irritating ratcheting swivel which has been completely removed as well as improved. BTW the swivel adjusting handle can be moved by pulling and re-positioning it in the event the handle is being blocked by the strobe’s body or any attachments.

I’ve had zero issues with my units, only with the early remote heads where the LED modeling lights would fail after two months. If trolls are concerned about what happens if they drop the strobe, hell any strobe….well best of luck to them.

The overall length of the new Pro is longer than the AD600. I didn’t measure them, but the new Pro fits into my Pelican case which is what I wanted to know.

The Pro weighs 14 ounces more than the AD600

I purposely didn’t include the covers/Pro’s built in reflector to keep them apples to apples for weighing.

The charger input is the same as the AD600, but the OUTPUT is significantly higher in the Pro’s charger. 33.6v 1.3a. versus 12.6v 3.3a.

The swivel mount on the Pro has included an ingenious second hole and threaded mounting hole so that you can now mount the strobe vertically onto a lightstand when using the remote head. Very well done.

I prefer to use truss clamps when mounting the strobe to a lightstand. But now I don’t have to fabricate much. I simply bolt a spigot to the truss clamp.

Very easy!

With the new mounting hole you can simply buy a SuperClamp and pin to vertically attach the strobe to a lightstand. The advantage of using a SuperClamp over my truss clamp is the ability to use it on smaller diameter light stands.

Easy and Sano!

Whenever I have to travel with my strobes via airlines I remove the bulbs. TSA has broken bulbs before. I use these nifty short covers to protect the attachment points and LED modeling light.

The Pro’s bulbs are much larger in diameter than the AD600s so I found my old Tamrac MX5375 lens pouch works perfectly. They are no longer made, but there are plenty of others out there if you need to find one.

The Oryx Gear DSLR Lens Pouch, Medium which is available (and I just purchased and received) fits and protects the bulb perfectly when detached from the strobe body for transport.

Of course the real aspect of the Pro will be the light quality/battery life/recycle time. I’m very interested in recycle times and the Masking feature. For color consistency a separate menu choice like the Einsteins is great. But during those times my clients need absolute precise color I have never depended upon strobe color temperature, but instead the X-Rite Digital ColorChecker Passport and a recently calibrated monitor. 

I have confirmed that the new Flashpoint/Godox AD600 Pro works in HSS with the Pentax 645Z as explained in this post.

In preparation for a session this week I plan on using the Pro with my 69″ Elinchrom Octa WITHOUT a focusing rod. The session calls for a Vanity Fair style of light, so I will use ultra soft lighting which the Eli 69 delivers in spades.

The Elinchrom Bowens speedring had been back ordered so long on all of the online retailers I decided to modify one. Since I knew it would take a bit of work to do this I also decided to use one of Cheetahstand’s Low Profile Bowen Speed Ring Inserts. Those inserts are about 2/3’s of an inch shorter in depth than normal Bowens inserts. This would then allow my AD600/H600 bulbs to protrude further into modifiers allowing for a bit more power. Yeah you have to drill out all of the rivets, shave the new ring down to fit the Elinchrom speedring, but I was motivated!

Wow so combining the 600 Pro’s new bulb/socket design and my use of the Cheetahstand Low Profile Ring the bulb is actually flush with the speedring in the Eli 69! Very cool! 

Further aspects and more will be forthcoming….stay tuned.

29 May 2018

90 degree Light Stand Mounting for strobes – Updated May 29 2018

Update May 29 2018

David sent me a note (which is in the comments below) stating that the 8mm nut I specify is not the correct size. So I measured the bolt with my micrometer. I don’t want to disassemble the pin so my suggestion is for you to take your 90 degree brass fitting to any hardware store and measure the threads on one of their nut/bolt measuring stations. 

What is that mount you use to place the AD600 on a boom or lightstand when using the H600 remote head?

I had this article in my review of the AD600/xPLOR600 post. But so many people contact me about the self fabricated brackets I use to mount my xPLOR/Godox 600s on lightstands, I decided to copy the article about the brackets here as a separate post. To my knowledge no one makes a bracket that runs parallel with a lightstand so you can mount your strobe on the stand’s column. If you know of one other than what I describe below, please place a comment on this page so others can buy one.

I fabricated the mount I use because I could not find anything with a 90 degree angle that would not spin on a boom no matter how tight I’d tighten it down. My first try was with my trusty Manfrotto Superclamps which are great. But due to the weight/leverage of the AD600 base it just would not stay put enough for my taste. So I decided to use a truss clamp which never spins. But I had to fabricate the mounting…. (oh and thanks for asking if you can buy them from me, but I’m a pro shooter, not a pro fabricator….)

Parts:

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The truss clamp assembled.

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The 10mm long bolt goes inside the truss clamp. It is necessary to grind or file down two opposing sides so the head of the bolt will fit in the recessed portion of the clamp and not spin when tightened. The upright bolt is the longer 30mm one that is screwed into the other end of the brass pipe fitting which becomes your light mount. Once you have tightened the bolt into the pipe fitting you will need to cut off the head of the bolt and either grind or file it down. The 8mm nut secures it to the pipe fitting so it does not loosen from the pipe fitting. I notched the stud so the screw from the AD600 would rest in that notch as an extra measure of safety in case the screw from the AD600 loosens.

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The truss clamp I use is just right for stand diameters like C stand poles. For smaller diameters I just use some PVC pipe cut in half and filed down so it is not a complete circle. I then used gaff tape to join one side and small pieces of grip tape on the inside to prevent spinning of the PVC on the metal light stand. Works perfectly!

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As you can see in this photo the truss clamp works perfectly and does not spin. Because the length of the remote head to the light is about seven feet I still needed an additional counterweight, so I used a Manfrotto 15 pound boom counter weight.

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How I use the clamp on a vertical light stand.

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One HUGE advantage of my DIY clamp is I can leave it on my on location light stands and they fold as compact as if it was not attached! I leave them on my onlo stands because it’s just so easy to forget things, which I sometimes can do. And BTW all of my onlo stand have an adjustable leg. I seldom if ever encounter flat ground when on location!

24 May 2018

Flashpoint 600 on location – Antoine Hunter in CalArt’s Magazine “The Pool” Updated May 24 2018

UPDATE May 24 2018

CalArts has placed their entire Summertime Issue 2018 #3 online.

Original Post

In January 2018 the Editor of The Pool, an alumni magazine for the California Institute for the Arts contacted me about a feature they had planned for their 3rd edition of the publication. CalArts was incorporated in 1961 as the first degree-granting institution of higher learning in the United States created specifically for students of both the visual and performing arts. It offers Bachelor of Fine Arts, Master of Fine Arts, Master of Arts, and Doctor of Musical Arts degrees among six schools: Art; Critical Studies; Dance; Film/Video; Music; and Theater.

The publication wanted to feature one of their alumni – Antoine Hunter a deaf dancer, choreographer and educator. The editor informed me that Antoine had specifically requested that I create the imagery for his feature which prompted CalArts to commission me for the honored task. I met Antoine when he danced for Savage Jazz Dance Company of Oakland where I created publicity imagery for their troupe.

As with all creative endeavors my workflow was to meet with Antoine over coffee to discuss the mood he’d like to have for his imagery. Once we had our meeting I contacted the editor to discuss his wishes and we scheduled the session in and around iconic San Francisco landmarks. He wanted the imagery to reflect the majestic flavor of Antoine’s home. Beyond that, the artistic elements were left to my discretion which I always appreciate.

In March the editor flew up for the day and we began the session. Even though there was a chance of rain I was confident that the areas I had selected would be shielded from rain if it occurred. As luck would have it, it was a glorious day with wonderful clouds in the sky that I adore. Antoine brought his 6 year old daughter to the event along with his ASL interpreter. Even though we had not discussed shots of him and his daughter, I took them anyway as a memento of that day which he could have for his own memories. I too have kids and having imagery of them never gets old. In the end the magazine used one of the photos which I felt added much to his story. I’ve often found that the images created outside of an assignment are often used and enrich a story.

I didn’t expect the magazine to use this photo of Antoine. I took it and converted it to black and white out of my own preference. I’m really happy they chose to use it as the opening image for his article.

For all of the images I used a two Flashpoint 600s with extension flash heads to keep weight on the modifier end to a minimum. The modifier I used was a PCB Omni reflector which is my go to outdoor modifier. I had written a blog post about how I converted it to accept a Bowens mount. It is great in wind which is always a concern with my on location shoots. I planned to utilize two of these and had both with me during the sessions. All of the images were created using HSS between 1/1000th and 1/2000th of a second depending on my location and the sun’s intensity at the time. Generally the aperture was f2.8.

My plan was to NOT make the images appear lit, but balanced in natural light yet with a high production value. The only exception was when I created his portrait in a tunnel that is very darkly lit. In this instance I used two of the lights, one as a backlight to rim his figure and the other as a key light. The back light modifier was a simple 7 inch cone on a Flashpoint 600. The magazine ended up using that shot for the cover and I’m really pleased with the results.

I continue to be impressed with the performance, flexibility and quality of my 600 units, both as a monolight or  with an extension head. They are key to my work and the innovation in their ability to convert from a monolight to a pack/head or 1200ws head offers me options other manufacturers don’t offer  or match at the price point. I often chuckle when I read others who are so concerned about a 1/3 drop of power when using the extension heads. I guess increasing their ISO 1/3 of a stop doesn’t occur to them! LOL!!!! Some people will bitch about absolutely anything rather then spending their time on creating.

Gallery of images. Not all were utilized in the publication.

22 Apr 2018

Fabricating a Fresnel w/gobo for a strobe – Update April 22 2018

UPDATE April 22 2018

I recently used this unit during a session with a Fresnel. It can be found here.

UPDATE April 18 2018

I recently tested the Flashpoint xPLOR600 Pro on location using my gobo device for an upcoming session. Because of the Pro’s excellent modeling light I was able to see exactly where the pattern falls even in bright daylight. Plus the LED modeling light does not generate enough heat to affect the plastic Fresnel lenses in the unit.

Light pattern was created with a Rosco gobo titled “Construction.”

UPDATE March 25 2018

I decided to update this post even though the two gobo modifiers I use are sadly no longer available. The first unit I’m talking about is the SP Image Projector. It uses Rosco size B metal gobos. When it was available it was very inexpensive as well as very effective. I’m updating this post to say that I’ve adapted it to accept any Bowens strobe since I’ve switched from PCB Einsteins to Godox/xPLOR600 units. I also needed to have the ability to rotate the gobo holder so that I can angle the unit to suit my needs. When I was using the PCB strobes Paul’s mounting system allowed me to rotate the unit when attached to an Einstein. Not so with a Bowens mount so I simply used an older Bowens speed ring which allows me to rotate the SP Image Projector. 

My DIY mount to allow the use of Bowens strobe units. The thumbscrew allows me to rotate the gobo unit.

Rosco Size B window gobo. The heat from a theatrical follow spot caused the discoloration. I bought my gobos used.

I can rotate the SP unit at will to suit the mood or scene.

Keeping the gobo level in this test shot.

The SP Image Projector which sadly is no longer available.

I have used the SP Image Projector along with an appropriate gobo in many a commercial shoot. This was to portray Lee Harvey Oswald in the play “Assassins”

I used the SP Image Projector along with a jailhouse door gobo in a commercial shoot. This was to portray a convicted felon in prison in the play “Assassins”

The Bowens Universal Spot Attachment is yet another gobo strobe modifier that is no longer available. It uses the smaller Rosco M size gobos. What was so nice about this unit is that there is no fabricating to use it on a Bowens mount strobe.

For my project “Tango in the Mohave” I used the Bowens Spot Attachment with a cathedral window gobo paired with the Flashpoint Portable 1200ws Extension Head. Remarkable combination. Funny back story, when Eva, the dancer in this photo saw it on my iPad during the session she asked “Mark, where is the window? I didn’t see it when you were taking this photo.” LOL so cute!!!

Apparently both of these gobo modifiers were not popular enough for each manufacturer to continue producing them. Sad. I know that there are companies who make gobo projectors for speedlights so all is not lost if you want to use one. Before I found any of these unit I converted a Leko 1000w tungsten theatrical follow spot into a strobe gobo modifier. I wrote a post about this crazy idea and will be converting it to accept a Bowens mount. Yeah it’s damn heavy, but produces the best light to date for gobo use paired with my 1200ws head. Just kinda impossible to take on an airplane! LOL!

Yeah it’s crazy as shit, but when you’re motivated and you want something, well….

UPDATE: August 4 2015

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One of the great advantages of having a portable gobo/strobe combination is the ability to use patterns of light outside of a studio environment. Recently I wanted to create the illusion of a window on a painted concrete wall located in a parking structure. I loved the texture the wall provided so I simply took my gobo device, one Einstein strobe hooked to a Vagabond Mini Lithium battery. An incredible little combination for on location light pattern needs.

Original Article

For years I have hauled around a full size stage follow spot just so I could use gobos in special photo shoot sessions. For anyone who knows me I seldom complain, it’s just how I was raised. But I will say that on a CONSISTENT basis my primary bitch is lugging gear. I hate it, I literally hate lifting, hauling and dragging gear to and from the airport, onto the car rental shuttle, into the rental counter, into the car, into the hotel, back out of the hotel into the car and then into the client’s venue. And then all of that in reverse. Get the picture? Assistants? Sure, but not on every assignment….

My SP unit with a multi circle Rosco B gobo as an accent light shot with an Einstein strobe with haze in the air. Key light is an Einstein camera left shot through a PCB Extreme silver PLM.

(more…)

10 Apr 2018

OneEyeLand 2018 B/W Awards

I’m proud to have been named as a Finalist in the 2018 OneEyeland B/W awards under Nudes. I’m especially thrilled since Howard Schatz was one of the judges. I’ve LONG admired his work so I’m honored! My submission was one of the images I created for my “Tango in the Mohave” series with Eva and Patricio.

Tango in the Mohave

 

21 Mar 2018

OPENCLOUD Glass Diffusers for Godox AD600/1200

 

While reading an article that Markus Klinko wrote I found an effective glass diffusion dome to go over the AD600/1200 bulbs. He uses them primarily in Fresnel modifiers and I can understand why. Unlike focusing arm modifiers or diffusion panel softboxes, Fresnel lenses project a beam of light through a lens. So any details or more accurately patterns of the bulb element will be projected onto the subject. I found this in my own experiment with the now discontinued PCB Retro Laser modifier which projects light through a parabolic (a real parabola!). When I was using my 1200ws head that contains two bulbs elements the resulting light showed the separate bulb patterns in my test.

Two separate elements reside in the 1200ws bulb.

My PCB Retro Laser with the 1200 head.

1/4000th ISO 100. Distance from light to target is 35 yards (105 Feet, 32 meters). The two element bulb pattern is clearly visible.

I noticed that the diffusion glass cover he uses is sourced from China so I found one that may be made in China but has a short shipping time. That is the one I’m reviewing which is the Opencloud brand I found on Amazon. It’s also less expensive which is interesting since the one he uses is sold by Opencloud as well…go figure!

Fits well over the 1200 ws bulb.

I had to remove some of the foam tape located at the rim of the frosted glass cover so that it would fit over the bulb without too much friction.

I simply removed some of the foam tape so that it easily slides over the bulb yet is still secure.

Fits well on the AD600 bulb as well.

Without diffusion glass cover.

I decided to test the cover to see if the diffusion reduces the output of the strobe. I placed my Sekonic meter 10 feet away and set the AD600 to 1:1 power without any modifier. Without the cover at 1/100, ISO 100 the output was f14. With the diffusion cover it was f13. Now before you all get your panties in a twist thinking “Wow that is very low!” remember that a 7″ cone reflector is going to amplify the light much more than just firing any strobe with a bare bulb. My point is NOT to show how powerful the strobe is but to test to see if the glass diffusion cover reduces the output, and it does by only a third of a stop.

I plan to use the glass diffusion cover whenever I use my Retro Laser, Fresnel, PCB Omni or any other modifier where the bulb is focused without diffusion where I notice an element pattern on my subject. It’s nice to have this inexpensive option.

25 Feb 2018

On location with the AD200s and AD-B2s

I was asked to create some trombonist’s imagery for his upcoming Fall 2018 CD release. I’m not a fan of doing classical musician’s portraits simply because most of the time they just want a head shot with their instrument….YAWN! I often refer them to other photographers as I have little interest in that type of photography. But both the musician and his marketing director agreed to allow me the freedom to art direct the shoot so I agreed. 

Having worked with a number of symphonies I am well aware that there is a good natured (sometimes not so good natured!) rivalry between strings, percussion and brass players. So I thought that creating his portrait on the beach over a string instrument bonfire would be so appropriate and fun! Most important – it matches his personality! I had an old cello I had cut to photograph the interior for a different shoot years ago along with a prop violin that I was willing to burn. They flew into San Francisco from Nashville and we were off to the beach!

My decision for photography gear was to use my AD200s and the AD-B2s I own. Plenty of light and easily transportable since I had to lug all of the gear onto the beach. (I HATE lugging!) For the modifiers I used Aputure Fresnel heads as I love their focusing ability and those modifiers would match the style of light I wanted for the session. They’re also dead easy to gel and grid too.

How the scene appears just before sunset in natural light.

Quick light test before all the fun begins. His marketing person was going to eat all of the marshmallows before we began! She apparently LOVES them! 

It’s always fun to let the talent look at my iPad which is wirelessly tethered to my camera. I find it helps relax people as I’m setting up the session.

Yet another light test to ensure the marshmallows are well lit! Hahahahaha

Ah the smell of burning string instruments! What could warm a brass player’s heart more than that?

A fun shot for the back of the jewel case.

The AD200s mated to the AD-B2s are remarkable pieces of gear. So portable and so versatile. I love the flexibility they allow me both in studio and on location. Why not use my AD600s? I believe in using the right tool for the right job. The 600s would have been overkill from a power standpoint and much heavier to lug onto the beach.