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Category : Latest News

22 Apr 2018

Fabricating a Fresnel w/gobo for a strobe – Update April 22 2018

UPDATE April 22 2018

I recently used this unit during a session with a Fresnel. It can be found here.

UPDATE April 18 2018

I recently tested the Flashpoint xPLOR600 Pro on location using my gobo device for an upcoming session. Because of the Pro’s excellent modeling light I was able to see exactly where the pattern falls even in bright daylight. Plus the LED modeling light does not generate enough heat to affect the plastic Fresnel lenses in the unit.

Light pattern was created with a Rosco gobo titled “Construction.”

UPDATE March 25 2018

I decided to update this post even though the two gobo modifiers I use are sadly no longer available. The first unit I’m talking about is the SP Image Projector. It uses Rosco size B metal gobos. When it was available it was very inexpensive as well as very effective. I’m updating this post to say that I’ve adapted it to accept any Bowens strobe since I’ve switched from PCB Einsteins to Godox/xPLOR600 units. I also needed to have the ability to rotate the gobo holder so that I can angle the unit to suit my needs. When I was using the PCB strobes Paul’s mounting system allowed me to rotate the unit when attached to an Einstein. Not so with a Bowens mount so I simply used an older Bowens speed ring which allows me to rotate the SP Image Projector. 

My DIY mount to allow the use of Bowens strobe units. The thumbscrew allows me to rotate the gobo unit.

Rosco Size B window gobo. The heat from a theatrical follow spot caused the discoloration. I bought my gobos used.

I can rotate the SP unit at will to suit the mood or scene.

Keeping the gobo level in this test shot.

The SP Image Projector which sadly is no longer available.

I have used the SP Image Projector along with an appropriate gobo in many a commercial shoot. This was to portray Lee Harvey Oswald in the play “Assassins”

I used the SP Image Projector along with a jailhouse door gobo in a commercial shoot. This was to portray a convicted felon in prison in the play “Assassins”

The Bowens Universal Spot Attachment is yet another gobo strobe modifier that is no longer available. It uses the smaller Rosco M size gobos. What was so nice about this unit is that there is no fabricating to use it on a Bowens mount strobe.

For my project “Tango in the Mohave” I used the Bowens Spot Attachment with a cathedral window gobo paired with the Flashpoint Portable 1200ws Extension Head. Remarkable combination. Funny back story, when Eva, the dancer in this photo saw it on my iPad during the session she asked “Mark, where is the window? I didn’t see it when you were taking this photo.” LOL so cute!!!

Apparently both of these gobo modifiers were not popular enough for each manufacturer to continue producing them. Sad. I know that there are companies who make gobo projectors for speedlights so all is not lost if you want to use one. Before I found any of these unit I converted a Leko 1000w tungsten theatrical follow spot into a strobe gobo modifier. I wrote a post about this crazy idea and will be converting it to accept a Bowens mount. Yeah it’s damn heavy, but produces the best light to date for gobo use paired with my 1200ws head. Just kinda impossible to take on an airplane! LOL!

Yeah it’s crazy as shit, but when you’re motivated and you want something, well….

UPDATE: August 4 2015

_PEN7955-Edit

One of the great advantages of having a portable gobo/strobe combination is the ability to use patterns of light outside of a studio environment. Recently I wanted to create the illusion of a window on a painted concrete wall located in a parking structure. I loved the texture the wall provided so I simply took my gobo device, one Einstein strobe hooked to a Vagabond Mini Lithium battery. An incredible little combination for on location light pattern needs.

Original Article

For years I have hauled around a full size stage follow spot just so I could use gobos in special photo shoot sessions. For anyone who knows me I seldom complain, it’s just how I was raised. But I will say that on a CONSISTENT basis my primary bitch is lugging gear. I hate it, I literally hate lifting, hauling and dragging gear to and from the airport, onto the car rental shuttle, into the rental counter, into the car, into the hotel, back out of the hotel into the car and then into the client’s venue. And then all of that in reverse. Get the picture? Assistants? Sure, but not on every assignment….

My SP unit with a multi circle Rosco B gobo as an accent light shot with an Einstein strobe with haze in the air. Key light is an Einstein camera left shot through a PCB Extreme silver PLM.

(more…)

21 Apr 2018

Converting a Mole Junior 412 Fresnel – UPDATE 4-21-18

UPDATE 4-21-18

I was finally able to run a session with both the converted Mole Richardson and my gobo light modifier where I use Rosco size B gobos. The Mole Richardson performed brilliantly. Since I was in studio I did not use both AD600s, but rather a single one. Barn doors were used along with a light modifier I am not allowed to display or mention. I used it as a fill for these shots.

Canon 1DXII ISO 100 1/250th f4.0

Canon 1DXII ISO 100 1/250th f4.0

Canon 1DXII ISO 100 1/250th f4.0

UPDATE 3-31-18

The final tweaks have been made to my now converted Mole Richardson Junior 412 2000w tungsten spotlight into a strobe. I have installed a Flashpoint 1200ws strobe head into the unit along with a 9″ reflector as well a diffusion bulb cover. I love the look large Fresnel lenses offer for light and plan to use this not only for portraits, but for dance. The modifications I’ve made allow me to convert the Fresnel BACK INTO a tungsten light. The design of the light is genius. By simply removing four machine screws the entire guts of the light simply drop out.

Simply removing the tungsten bulb, reflector mirror and power supply is all I had to do. Then I fabricated a mount and limiting arm to mount the 1200ws strobe head. The hole in the upper right allows me to push the connector through the box.

I covered the hole by using a garbage disposal rubber cover.

The Flashpoint 1200ws head. If I don’t need 1200ws I simply hook up one xPLOR600 strobe body. The 9″ reflector fits perfectly in the housing.

You can see the dual elements in the 1200ws bulb here. I have the head in the “Spot” or focused position in this shot.

To ensure the light is as smooth as possible I’ve installed a frosted glass cover over the 1200ws bulb.

On the front and back of the Fresnel are mechanical levers which allow me to move the light from Flood to spot. Here it is n the Flood position.

As you can see the light is now in the Spot position.

Here I wanted to see how sharp the shadows are produced by a Fresnel.

Testing the Mole Fresnel as the key light with a gobo for background pattern of light and an Aputure Fresnel for fill.

Bob without any fill light.

Bob with fill light from the Aputure Fresnel mated to an eVOLV200.

All done and ready for my first shoot. Total cost: 327.52 USD for a 10″ Fresnel that accepts a modern strobe.

In the future when I use this modifier I won’t be posting the photos here. I’ll simply identify that I used my Mole Fresnel strobe with the images.

UPDATE 3-29-18

I wanted to try the converted unit outdoors using the barn doors and HSS. Still more refinements, but I believe this will make a valuable tool in my lighting kit. Both images shot at 1/2500th f2.8 ISO160

600ws head being used.

Barn doors configured as a vertical slit. Fully flooded zoom position on the modifier.

Barn doors open wide as to not affect the light. Mid focused Fresnel. Love the ultra sharp shadows Fresnel lenses produce.

Original Post March 27 2018

I’ve been in love with the light a Fresnel throws. As a young man I marveled at Hollywood glamour portraits produces by film and Fresnel spotlights. I purchased and have used two Aputure 4.5″ Bowens mount Fresnel modifiers with much success. But I longed for a larger version of a Fresnel. So I researched models over 8″ in diameter. The only ones I could find were the Elinchrom FS30 and the Broncolor Flooter. 3k and 4.5k respectively in price. There are some new LED Fresnel lights that are great, but I wanted a strobe. So….

I purchased a used Mole-Richardson Junior 2K Fresnel Tungsten Light, 10″ Lens – 412 off of Craigslist and am converting it to accept a strobe. It’s going well and when the project is finished I’ll be posting how I did my conversion as well as some test shots. I’m excited to say the least as it’s going way better than I expected. I wanted to have the ability to switch from my 600ws head to my 1200ws head when needed. I love choices. One of the great design elements of this classic unit is the ability to switch it back to its native tungsten configuration. AND Mole Richardson sells a LED conversion kit that only takes four screws to install. The unit is designed so well. No wonder so many film studios used these things!

My total cost to convert it to accept a strobe including the cost of the unit? 315.00 including the barn doors! 

Focused

Flooded

19 Apr 2018

Aputure Fresnel Lens Updated April 19 2018

UPDATE April 19 2018

Recently I have favored Fresnel lighting for my on location outdoor sessions. The flexibility of the Fresnel’s ability to focus its beam, it’s matching light quality to sunlight and the stability of the modifier in high wind makes it a winner for my work. The other aspect of my work I’ve been trying to improve is the ability to make a lit scene not look lit. It takes much more finesse to light any scene as if it is just natural light, but with a high production look. Still much more to learn, but the Aputure Fresnel is a remarkable tool. My strobe of choice for this session was the Flashpoint xPLOR600 Pro.

This is how the location looks in natural light.

Just using enough fill from the Fresnel so as not to cast a strobe shadow takes practice. 1/320th f4.5

By far the most difficult lighting balance on that day was this shot. To not overpower the ambient light, cast any strobe shadows and yet fill in the talent took some effort. 1/250th f3.5

1/250 f3.5

1/500th f2.8

UPDATE February 25 2018

I’ve written an on location post where I’ve utilized an Aputure head.

UPDATE January 26 2018

I’ve recently written a post about my use of the xPLOR600/eVOLV200s with several different modifiers for a session. You can find that post here.

UPDATE October 2 2017

I have written a post about a dance session I conducted that uses these items. You can view that post here.

UPDATE September 10 2017

I recently posted an article on my use of all Godox units in one session. The article includes the use of this product. You can view that post here.

My initial findings for the Aputure Fresnel Lens – July 6 2017

Because I work with so many theatrical stage lighting designers and bow to their artistry along with how COMPLEX their jobs become, I am very familiar with the Fresnel lens. It’s a staple of the constant light stage world and was very popular in the early Hollywood celebrity portrait days. Many shooters now love ‘soft light’ the softer the better in their minds. But the use of bare bulb lighting and Fresnel light is very powerful and effective to convey the right mood in a shot. So for a whopping $69.00 I decided to buy the Aputure Fresnel Lens off of Amazon.

An example of my use of bare bulb lighting.

The body of the modifier is made of fiberglass and is extremely sturdy. The Bowens mounts fit perfectly into all of my Bowens mount lights including Godox and Xplor units. The construction is very well executed. I appreciate the 7″ reflector around the lens which easily accepts the grids and barn doors I have for my other hard reflectors. If you don’t want the reflector it’s easy enough to unscrew from the housing.

A handy degree marking is built into the left side of the housing. Adjustment is easy and smooth by loosening a knob on the opposite side of the mount to slide the lens forward or backward. Extending the lens reduces the angle of light.

Looking ‘into’ the housing from the back of the unit.

The front view of the unit. Four hex screws hold the 7″ reflector to the unit.

One of the things I will find out in actual use is how much light bleed from the vents on the side of the housing cause. I believe that will depend on where/how the strobes are placed in relation to the subject. Since the unit is made to be used with all Bowens mount units the vents are placed to dissipate heat. I don’t imagine that the light bleed from the vents will affect my work unless I’m using the unit for an overhead light which may bleed onto any seamless I’m using. Time will tell and if that is the case I will simply use some Cinefoil to mask off any bleeding light. Stay tuned….

I wanted to determine how much light loss happens using this modifier compared to a bare bulb or 7″ cone. My little test was done outside in daylight. Using an Xplor 600 at maximum power (1:1), 20 feet from the wooden wall, measured with a Sekonic L-358 light meter, ISO 100, 100th of a second. My finding:

  • Bare Bulb: f9.0
  • 7 inch cone: f9.0
  • Aputure Fresnel: f8.0

The f8.0 was when the unit is set at the maximum spread of 42 degrees. Things change when I zoomed the Fresnel to the 15 degree mark which yields f9.0 at the same distance.

No strobe, shaded daylight illuminates the wooden wall as my control shot.

Fresnel set to 42 degrees, 20 feet from the wall.

Fresnel set to 15 degrees 20 feet from the wall.

Obviously I will be continuing to update this post when I use it on a commercial shoot. In September I have a dance session where I plan to use this unit along with a gobo strobe modifier. At this point I’m very pleased with the construction and operation of the unit. Stay tuned.

04 Apr 2018

Flashpoint Godox AD600Pro – UPDATED April 4 2018

UPDATE April 4 2018

My client has just released the press imagery for Hunchback of Notre Dame so I am now able to share them. The session was held on location in Seattle at the Volunteer Park Water Tower which is four stories. After obtaining the required permits we had to lug all of the grip and lighting gear up four stories and I HATE LUGGING! LOL… Because the remote head was not yet available I didn’t use any focusing arms for this session. My modifiers of choice were the Elinchrom 69″ Octa and the SMDV 110cm octa. I used the 600Pro in the Eli and an xPLOR600 in the SMDV.

The four story water tower. We shot at the top for most of the session.

Boy how I wanted an escalator! LOL!!!!

The 600 Pro inside the Eli 69″ octa. Pentax 645Z shot at HSS.

The 600 Pro inside the Eli 69″ octa. Pentax 645Z shot at HSS.

The 600 Pro inside the SMDV 110cm octa. Pentax 645Z shot at HSS.

The 600 Pro inside the Eli 69″ octa. Pentax 645Z shot at HSS.

Toughest shot, natural light with the 645Z.

The talent, hair, makeup, wardrobe and marketing team. The 600 Pro inside the Eli 69″ octa. Pentax 645Z shot at HSS.

UPDATE March 15 2018

During recent client sessions, both of which were on location I had the opportunity to use the AD600 Pro in combination with a number of modifiers. Because the remote head for the Pro is not yet released I did not use any focusing rod modifiers. In one session whose images I cannot at this time, I used the Pro in an Elinchrom 69″ Octa with both diffusion panels installed. I did not go over 1/4 power and was shooting HSS with my Pentax 645Z. The unit performed flawlessly.

In the session I can post images below I used the Pro in a SMDV 44″ (110cm) octa with both diffusion panels installed. The interior of the theatre where I was doing these portraits was very dark so I appreciated the very bright modeling light so that I could easily obtain focus. To date I’ve found the Pro model exemplary in recycle time, modeling light and ease of use.

Waiting for the talent. It looks much brighter in this phone camera image than it actually appeared in real life!

Pro with SMDV 110cm camera left. Just out of frame camera right is my Sunbounce Mini reflector using the white side.

Pro with SMDV 110cm modifier directly in front of the talent. I’m shooting from below the modifier with the Sunbounce reflector under her face just out of frame.

 UPDATE: February 21 2018

Yesterday I was able to utilize the Pro during a commercial session. Here are my observations:

  • The modeling light is VERY bright, as bright as my former Einstein strobes.
  • IF I use the modeling light at any power that enables the fan, the battery life is much shorter than the AD600. My session was only three hours and at the end of it I had only one bar left on power. Keep in mind that I was using the modeling light at 100% during the entire session. The strobe only went to sleep after 30 minutes of non use. I will need to experiment with power control on this unit, i.e, modeling light, sleep time, etc.
  • The swivel mechanism is MUCH MORE ROBUST and far easier to adjust than the AD600. I tend to adjust the position of my lights often and in incremental steps during my sessions and the ability to pivot the modifier is excellent. Not having a ratcheting mechanism makes all the difference.
  • The recycling times are extraordinary. Literally no waiting for the strobe to recycle IF you’re not using 1:1 power. One second can seem like a lifetime when I’m shooting, but I seldom use 1:1 in rapid shooting. Normally in studio I’m at power levels of 1/32 to 1/2 at the most. I’m not a “spray and pray” shooter so when I say that I shoot at will, it’s when I see a gesture or expression that I want. And at those power levels it allows me to shoot at will.
  • Because the unit swivels so freely I will purchase the optional handle when it’s released. Although I plan to use the Pro with focusing arm modifiers and can use those to pivot the strobe, I’d prefer to use the handle.

That’s it for now. I used the Pro with the Adorama 65″ Glow Easy Lock X-Large Deep Beaded Silver Fiberglass Umbrella. Incredible modifier which I’m finding can rival my focusing arm modifiers in some instances!

Original Article

I debated waiting to write an entire review of my experience using the new Flashpoint Godox AD600Pro strobe until I had tested most of the items important to me. Because this is my high season it would take me about six months to do a soup to nuts review. So I’m opting to write my findings piecemeal meaning – as I go along. Sorry, but I felt it best to do it this way for this strobe. As I integrate the unit into my workflow I will make mental notes and add my findings to this review. 

Also since I almost exclusively use focusing arm modifiers now, I probably won’t have extensive use of the Pro until the remote head is released.

Things that are immediately apparent as improvements over the Flashpoint Godox AD600 units:

  • The swivel adjustment is nice and smooth now. No more ratcheting which I hated and modified on my units.
  • The modeling light is B R I G H T and adjustable to the output of the strobe. Like my old Einsteins. Love that
  • The swivel mount now allows you to place the unit in a vertical (parallel to the light stand) position using a SuperClamp and a stud.
  • I like the power button located on the bottom of the unit rather than the side. When I pack my strobes into my Pelican cases I often worry about the units turning on due to the pressure from the foam pads. So I always detach the batteries which airlines don’t like in checked luggage. Also simply pressing the power button now turns to unit off immediately. I like that. You must hold the power button down for 2-3 seconds to power the unit up.
  • The Bowens mount seems much more snug than the AD600. But that depends on the modifier too.

Some people ‘may’ feel that the build quality is ‘better’ on the Pro but I never thought the AD600 exhibited poor build quality….except for the irritating ratcheting swivel which has been completely removed as well as improved. BTW the swivel adjusting handle can be moved by pulling and re-positioning it in the event the handle is being blocked by the strobe’s body or any attachments.

I’ve had zero issues with my units, only with the early remote heads where the LED modeling lights would fail after two months. If trolls are concerned about what happens if they drop the strobe, hell any strobe….well best of luck to them.

The overall length of the new Pro is longer than the AD600. I didn’t measure them, but the new Pro fits into my Pelican case which is what I wanted to know.

The Pro weighs 14 ounces more than the AD600

I purposely didn’t include the covers/Pro’s built in reflector to keep them apples to apples for weighing.

The charger input is the same as the AD600, but the OUTPUT is significantly higher in the Pro’s charger. 33.6v 1.3a. versus 12.6v 3.3a.

The swivel mount on the Pro has included an ingenious second hole and threaded mounting hole so that you can now mount the strobe vertically onto a lightstand when using the remote head. Very well done.

I prefer to use truss clamps when mounting the strobe to a lightstand. But now I don’t have to fabricate much. I simply bolt a spigot to the truss clamp.

Very easy!

With the new mounting hole you can simply buy a SuperClamp and pin to vertically attach the strobe to a lightstand. The advantage of using a SuperClamp over my truss clamp is the ability to use it on smaller diameter light stands.

Easy and Sano!

Whenever I have to travel with my strobes via airlines I remove the bulbs. TSA has broken bulbs before. I use these nifty short covers to protect the attachment points and LED modeling light.

The Pro’s bulbs are much larger in diameter than the AD600s so I found my old Tamrac MX5375 lens pouch works perfectly. They are no longer made, but there are plenty of others out there if you need to find one.

The Oryx Gear DSLR Lens Pouch, Medium which is available (and I just purchased and received) fits and protects the bulb perfectly when detached from the strobe body for transport.

Of course the real aspect of the Pro will be the light quality/battery life/recycle time. I’m very interested in recycle times and the Masking feature. For color consistency a separate menu choice like the Einsteins is great. But during those times my clients need absolute precise color I have never depended upon strobe color temperature, but instead the X-Rite Digital ColorChecker Passport and a recently calibrated monitor. 

I have confirmed that the new Flashpoint/Godox AD600 Pro works in HSS with the Pentax 645Z as explained in this post.

In preparation for a session this week I plan on using the Pro with my 69″ Elinchrom Octa WITHOUT a focusing rod. The session calls for a Vanity Fair style of light, so I will use ultra soft lighting which the Eli 69 delivers in spades.

The Elinchrom Bowens speedring had been back ordered so long on all of the online retailers I decided to modify one. Since I knew it would take a bit of work to do this I also decided to use one of Cheetahstand’s Low Profile Bowen Speed Ring Inserts. Those inserts are about 2/3’s of an inch shorter in depth than normal Bowens inserts. This would then allow my AD600/H600 bulbs to protrude further into modifiers allowing for a bit more power. Yeah you have to drill out all of the rivets, shave the new ring down to fit the Elinchrom speedring, but I was motivated!

Wow so combining the 600 Pro’s new bulb/socket design and my use of the Cheetahstand Low Profile Ring the bulb is actually flush with the speedring in the Eli 69! Very cool! 

Further aspects and more will be forthcoming….stay tuned.

29 Mar 2018

Converting a Stage Follow Spot to Accept a Strobe – Updated 3-29-18

UPDATE March 29 2018

Because I’ve changed from PCB Einsteins to Godox/Flashpoint 600s I needed to ‘convert my conversion’ to accept a Bowens mount. It was very easy since I simply bolted a Cheetahstand Low Profile Speedring onto the PCB umbrella reflector. His low profile speedrings allow the bulb to insert further into a modifier. Now I have the ability to not only use the 600ws heads but also the 1200ws head when needed. Very slick!

Original Article

Why? My view is why not?! A few years ago a friend asked if I wanted an old Leko stage follow spot. Being a bit of a lighting pack rat I said “Sure!” I originally used it so I could apply light shaped with gobos in my still photography for dance. It also allowed me to create lovely rays of light using haze combined with different gobo shapes. In its original state the Leko was a 1000 watt constant tungsten light. Plenty powerful for stage applications, but completely overpowered whenever I used it in conjunction with my Einstein strobes. Even though the Steins can go as low as 2.5WS doing simple math shows you that at 1000 watts shot at 1/250th of a second yields about 4WS, not a ton of power.

DSCF5789

Leko follow spot modified to accept a PCB Einstein strobe

(more…)

25 Mar 2018

Initial Sundisc 60cm portable impressions – Update 3-25-18

UPDATE: March 25 2018

I wanted to do a final test prior to using this modifier. I placed my eVOLV200 into the unit with both the Fresnel and bare bulb heads to see if there was any light output difference. I originally thought that the bare bulb would produce a higher output but I was wrong. Both the Fresnel and the bare bulb produced f32 at 2.5 feet from the front of the modifier. Power level for all shots was full power, 1:1. As I contemplated the output is not even across the face of the diffusion panel. Not unexpected since this is designed primarily for speedlights. Also ANY modifier where the light source is not centered would most likely not produce even output across the face of the diffusion panel:

With Fresnel Head

  • Center: f32
  • Right (where the strobe enters the modifier)” f29
  • Top: f30
  • Bottom: f29

With bare bulb attachment

  • Center: f32
  • Right (where the strobe enters the modifier)” f29
  • Top: f30
  • Bottom: f29

I also added my Godox AD-S18 Flash Tube Bulb Metal Protector Shovel Cap to see if blocking the flash bulb at the entry point would produce even light. But instead it reduced the amount of light across the entire face! Center was f22.

Godox AD-S18 flash tube shovel.

So I’ve determined for the uses where I plan to use the Sundiscs,  I will simply use the Fresnel head on the 200. It’s less prone to breakage than the bare bulb and I have a modeling light when using the Fresnel attachment. Keep in mind all of this was done using a Godox S Bracket to hold the 200.

Original Article

Sundisc

I came upon an article by Michael Sewell about the Sundisc modifier. His review intrigued me enough to further research the piece of kit. After looking it over on other sites and reading his review in full, I felt it worthwhile to invest in two to see how I could use them in my workflow. My original thought was to use them in those infrequent, but frantic ‘run and gun’ situations where a client needs me to go around different parts of a venue and with very little time with the talent. I also thought that they may be a nice alternative to overhead or side fill lights.

It took about two weeks from ordering to arrival since they are shipped from China directly to the consumer through Sundisc. As with all gear I test them thoroughly before even considering using them on set. Determining the best use of a tool along with how I would configure it is just protocol for my workflow. So the first task is always examining the quality of the construction. The units are well made, seams are well sewn, zippers and elastic are of high quality. The reflective materials are thick and well placed. The Sundisc allows you to reverse the modifier for silver or gold reflection, very nicely done. The elastic loops are designed to hold speedlights, but I found that using a Godox S Mount is much more useful than using the elastic bands. You’d have to use some sort of swivel anyway to mount this to a light stand so I found that an S Mount is just right for my use of the Sundisc.

The Godox S bracket fits perfectly snug inside the Sundisc.

I have modified my S brackets, removing the rubber from the compression bracket. It allows me to insert my eVOLV200s with the silicon skins attached.

Silver interior. Here you can see the elastic strap designed to hold a speedlight in place.

Close up of the elastic band. Although it is of high quality and well sewn, the band allows the Sundisc to ‘flop’ over once you tilt your speedlight beyond 80 degrees. I want to have the ability to adjust the modifier to any angle without it flopping over.

It’s extremely easy to reverse the Sundisc from silver to gold. A great design.

All of this would easily fit into a small backpack! Perfect for any run and gun imagery or portraiture.

At this point I only tested the Sundisc with my eVOLV200 using the Fresnel head. The bare bulb attachment would easily work as well. One of the other advantages of using the S bracket is the ability to place the head of the strobe very low in the modifier, thereby filling the entire surface of the diffusion panel. Keep in mind that I don’t think I’d ever use this outdoors or in a mild breeze. I’m not sure how the construction of the disk keeps the sides separate, but whatever is holding them apart works well. Yet even a slight breeze would cause the modifier to twist or turn, so for me I’d only consider using it indoors.

So I decided to try it on Bob to view the quality of light the Sundisc produces.

Bob’s set up. The Sundisc is about 5 feet away from him.

Very good quality of light, much like a nice softbox.

My eVOLV200 modeling light is turned on. As you can see by having the strobe placed low in the modifier, it allows the light to more fully fill the disc. By using the elastic band inside of the unit to hold a strobe or speedlight it places the unit about 4-6 inches into the modifier and creates a dark area at the bottom when triggered.

Some people may ask if the strobe produces any hot spots in the modifier close to the actual flash head. At this time I didn’t notice any hot spots.

This is most likely how I will use the Sundisc, as a hair or fill light. It’s very light at only 14 ounces and placing it on a boom with my eVOLV200 and S bracket will allow me to be very portable. Not to mention using a boom arm that is light weight.

Testing it as a hair light. Since like me, poor Bob has no hair so I let him use my custom made top hat!

During my initial evaluation of this unit I find that the quality of materials and the quality of light it produces is well worth the investment. Obviously during actual use more uses/issues may become apparent than just during my initial overview. I really like how thin the unit is and how small it packs down to transport. It’s very light weight as well which is another plus. The only downsides I see right now is my perceived inability to use the unit in a breeze, but other than that I’m happy to try them on a commercial shoot. Although they will work with my H600 remote heads using a Bowens ring to insert into the hole of the Sundisc, I doubt I’ll be using them that way. Using it as a key light? Uhhh….not sure, maybe? Like I always say, never say never….Time and experience will tell though…. 

25 Mar 2018

Doing Rather Than Talking

I admire people who do. I have little to no respect for those who only talk, or criticize and sharp shoot others who actually create or contribute. My partner alerted me to an article written by Paul Jarvis which I absolutely wanted to share. Enjoy…or not.

21 Mar 2018

OPENCLOUD Glass Diffusers for Godox AD600/1200

 

While reading an article that Markus Klinko wrote I found an effective glass diffusion dome to go over the AD600/1200 bulbs. He uses them primarily in Fresnel modifiers and I can understand why. Unlike focusing arm modifiers or diffusion panel softboxes, Fresnel lenses project a beam of light through a lens. So any details or more accurately patterns of the bulb element will be projected onto the subject. I found this in my own experiment with the now discontinued PCB Retro Laser modifier which projects light through a parabolic (a real parabola!). When I was using my 1200ws head that contains two bulbs elements the resulting light showed the separate bulb patterns in my test.

Two separate elements reside in the 1200ws bulb.

My PCB Retro Laser with the 1200 head.

1/4000th ISO 100. Distance from light to target is 35 yards (105 Feet, 32 meters). The two element bulb pattern is clearly visible.

I noticed that the diffusion glass cover he uses is sourced from China so I found one that may be made in China but has a short shipping time. That is the one I’m reviewing which is the Opencloud brand I found on Amazon. It’s also less expensive which is interesting since the one he uses is sold by Opencloud as well…go figure!

Fits well over the 1200 ws bulb.

I had to remove some of the foam tape located at the rim of the frosted glass cover so that it would fit over the bulb without too much friction.

I simply removed some of the foam tape so that it easily slides over the bulb yet is still secure.

Fits well on the AD600 bulb as well.

Without diffusion glass cover.

I decided to test the cover to see if the diffusion reduces the output of the strobe. I placed my Sekonic meter 10 feet away and set the AD600 to 1:1 power without any modifier. Without the cover at 1/100, ISO 100 the output was f14. With the diffusion cover it was f13. Now before you all get your panties in a twist thinking “Wow that is very low!” remember that a 7″ cone reflector is going to amplify the light much more than just firing any strobe with a bare bulb. My point is NOT to show how powerful the strobe is but to test to see if the glass diffusion cover reduces the output, and it does by only a third of a stop.

I plan to use the glass diffusion cover whenever I use my Retro Laser, Fresnel, PCB Omni or any other modifier where the bulb is focused without diffusion where I notice an element pattern on my subject. It’s nice to have this inexpensive option.

20 Mar 2018

Fucking Trolls

Long ago I gave up participating on forums. Why? Because like ex-girlfriends who just had to be right, I cannot stand people who talk, bitch and produce nothing. Or sadly feel their work is good! I do frequent a few sites, the-digital-picture where Bryan and Sean take their time and review camera gear with integrity. Flashhavoc is where I learn about new lighting items. And I recently started frequenting Lighting Rumours which also talks about new lighting gear but have reviews of some of the items. Markus Klinko a shooter whose body of work I admire, also posts some interesting information about gear he uses on that site. He’s a commercial photographer who has a link to his work in his articles which is very well done. One of the aspects of how he approaches gear is that the brand/cost is irrelevant to his decisions. He states he uses Elinchrom, Broncolor, Cheetahstand among others. He looks at the performance of a product, not the brand or price point. I admire that as I tend to do the very same thing in my own selections.

Most if not all fucking trolls NEVER have links to their work, EVER. Why? Well because they really don’t know how to shoot well yet love to hear themselves talk about gear. Their photos ‘may’ be ‘nice’ (my mentor’s word for shit work) but instead they like to bitch about anything and sharp shoot those who are expressing their views.

Working photographers who post reviews of gear they’ve used are people I truly respect. Trolls are the bottom feeders of any craft.

Here are examples of the comments relating the Markus’ quick personal review of the Elinchrom Indirect Litemotiv Octa 190cm. Not all are trolls, but you will be able to immediately identify those who fit that category:

 

Markus thanks for your personal assessments on Lighting Rumours. It takes time to write these things, I know that first hand. And thanks for supporting the craft of photography.

This article by Ilona isn’t about photography, but it is about fucking trolls. “Ever since the dawn of the internet, there have been trolls. These broken, deeply insecure people love nothing more than to bring others down to their level by preying on their insecurities.” What’s great though is if you’re not insecure it don’t mean shit.

17 Mar 2018

iRobot Roomba, Really?

OK so I know this is primarily a photography blog. Most folks come here for photo stuff…I think. But for me life is much more than just imagery. Hell I’ve written about ebike lights, toolboxes, my late Mom….it is after all my blog. So it means I can write about whatever I want and if you don’t wanna read about it, you don’t have to, do you?

I own my home in the Bay Area, one of the most expensive places in the world in which to live. And I plan to die here since I never plan to sell. So I keep up my place, I do the vast majority of housework, cleaning toilets, showers, the yard, laundry and yes vacuuming. Even though my girlfriend lives here her division of labor is cooking, albeit has somewhat dropped off. Since I travel for 50 percent of my work, doing chores is not something I look forward to when I’m home.

One of the things I really like are freshly washed towels and vacuumed carpet. I just like the way freshly vacuumed and clean carpet feels on my bare feet. But hauling out the vacuum cleaner, plugging it in, moving furniture, etc. isn’t something I’ve enjoyed. But I pay that price for a clean carpet so my tootsies can be happy when they get to walk on freshly vacuumed fiber. Weird maybe, but WTF I’m weird anyway.

So about four months ago a friend of mine was in town from Dallas to do a concert. He’s the co concertmaster at the Dallas Symphony Orchestra and we’ve become friends. We shared some talk about what’s been going on in our lives and he mentioned that for Christmas his parents bought him a “Roomba.” “OMG” I yelled,” I’ve wondered about those things but have never known anyone who has one. Plus they’re damn expensive!” He laughed and said he didn’t know anything about the cost, but loved his. He then showed me the app on his phone that shows how it can be scheduled, its vacuuming history, etc. Boring as shit stuff to most, but for me I was intrigued.

So we said our goodbyes and I went home and immediately searched Google for reviews of remote vacuum cleaners. I found this Consumer Reports review and decided on a Roomba 890 based on Nathan’s recommendation and their review. Man they’re expensive, ranging from 400 to 1000 bucks! So I did what I usually do, I looked for refurbs or “Like New” returned units and guess what? A model 890 was available for under 400 bucks so I took the plunge. Amazon has such an amazing return policy I figure if it didn’t work for me I could return it.

The Roomba 890 arrived, I installed the app on my Android device and I was off to the races. I named my 890 “Maria” (which is my gf’s first name (hehehe) and started her. But before all of that I vacuumed my entire house to see what if anything Maria would collect on her maiden voyage. What I noticed is she goes around my home (a single story place) without any seeming rhyme or reason. She got stuck in my bedroom walk in closet when she closed the door behind herself. She sometimes becomes confused in my bedroom having to navigate around all of the light stands and studio crap I have piled in there too. But most times she eventually finds her way out.

After her first voyage I was shocked when I opened her dust bin to find a lot of stuff! Remember I had just vacuumed the entire place so I expected very little to be collected. It may be due to the fact that she can go under furniture where my regular upright has trouble fitting. Or I’m just a shitty vacuum operator! One of the coolest things is how she collects long hair in her rotating brushes. It all gets pushed to the ends so when I remove the brushes to clean them the hair is easy to remove. I don’t have pets, but my gf has long hair. I have a shaved head so it’s certainly not mine. Cleaning her is very easy and I use my compressor to blow out all of the dust when she’s done.

“Maria’s” main page

You can schedule it whenever you want.

This is the 890’s main menu.

80 percent of the time Maria finds her way back to home base and docks to recharge. In the 20 percent when she can’t find her way back she runs out of battery life and just stops where she ran out.  My feet love being on freshly vacuumed carpet, even more so when I don’t have to do the damn vacuuming. My gf thinks I’m crazy, but I could care less. She’s not the one who ever vacuumed the place! On a flight home from Seattle she sat next to a woman who works for Amazon. And as luck would have it she was the one in charge of the vacuum devices division! She told my gf that ‘if you can afford it’ the Roomba line is the best one to buy.’

And just like with all things my gf believes what other people say way more than me. Is Maria worth the price? That’s up to each individual, but I’m happy to pay a bit more than a normal vacuum to eliminate a tedious chore, yet enjoy the feeling of clean carpet under my feet. Having my cake and eating it too…a rarity!

Maria has found a permanent home here. I love her. LOL!

15 Mar 2018

SMDV Alpha Speedbox-A110 Updated March 15 2018

UPDATE March 15 2018

During a recent client sessions, both of which were on location I had the chance to use the AD600 Pro in combination with a number of modifiers. Because the remote head for the Pro is not yet released I did not use any focusing rod modifiers. In one session where I cannot release the images at this time, I used the Pro in an Elinchrom 69″ Octa with both diffusion panels installed. I did not go over 1/4 power and was shooting HSS with my Pentax 645Z. The unit performed flawlessly.

In the session I can post images below I used the Pro in a SMDV 44″ (110cm) octa with both diffusion panels installed. The interior of the theatre where I was doing these portraits was very dark so I appreciated the very bright modeling light so that I could easily obtain focus. To date I’ve found the Pro model exemplary in recycle time, modeling light and ease of use.

Waiting for the talent. It looks much brighter in this phone camera image than it actually appeared in real life!

Pro with SMDV 110cm camera left. Just out of frame camera right is my Sunbounce Mini reflector using the white side.

Pro with SMDV 110cm modifier directly in front of the talent. I’m shooting from below the modifier with the Sunbounce reflector under her face just out of frame.

Original Post

A few years back I purchased a SMDV S70 28” softbox when I was using speed lights with modifiers. I was impressed at the quality of the light, but even more so with how it opened and closed with ease! Later Adorama started selling their own version of the softbox under the GlowPop brand. They use the very same mechanism as SMDV for opening and closing the unit. I bought one of the GlowPops for quick run and gun shooting and liked the light weight both units provided. I changed both of those modifiers from the speed light bracket to Bowens brackets since I no longer used speed lights.

I recently wanted a more robust modifier that would set up quickly and have a better attachment system than the SMDV or the Glow Pop. Both of those hold the speed light or Bowens bracket onto the speedring with VERY SMALL SCREWS and on both the GlowPop and SMDV units I own, they have stripped out. We’re talking Phillips screws so small you must use a jeweler’s screwdriver to remove or install them. That’s small!

I’m also in the process of ‘paring down’ the number of modifiers I’ve collected over the years. My personal rule of thumb is if a modifier like my Zeppelin 47” with its heavy mounting bracket can be replaced by something within 10% of its size I’ll do it! You see I use focusing arms for many of my modifiers so I seldom use the diffusion panels that come with the modifiers. After doing some research I found that SMDV sells an A110 softbox that measures 44”, close enough! Plus it’s much lighter and a great shape for ‘parabolic’ focusing using a focusing rod. And their signature opening and closing mechanism makes it even sweeter to replace the Zep.

The largest GlowPop made is 38” and still uses those tiny damn screws to hold the bracket onto the speedring. The SMDV makes a 44” which fits within my personal parameters when I’m considering replacing another modifier for various reasons, in this case my 47” Zep.

So here are some of my initial tests using my trusty buddy “Bob” to ascertain the light qualities/spread/focusing capabilities of the modifier. If you are not familiar with focusing arm modifiers I suggest you search the web. This post is simply about my own findings with the SMDV 110. As I use this on real client sessions I will be updating this post. If at some point I opt to use the SMDV 110 with its included diffusion panels I will post those images as well.

This is a HUGE improvement made by SMDV! No longer using those silly little jeweler’s size Phillips screws to hold the bracket onto the speedring! Plus it gives me the flexibility to change from Bowens to Profoto if I want to use my Parabolix focusing arm with the 110. Yay!!! Those small plastic tabs replaced the pair of tabs to close the softbox on the smaller  SMDV units. I find that just like the smaller units with only a pair of tabs, it is best if you apply downward pressure on the softbox as you press the tabs to release the rods.

I appreciate both the silver material SMDV uses on this unit along with the tension the 12 rods put on the material to spread it evenly. The unit is well made.

Using the light in its fully flooded position.

Bob in the fully flooded position. The modifier is directly behind me and I’m standing in front of the modifier. It resembles the look of a beauty dish in this configuration.

Light is fully focused in this shot.

Bob in the fully focused position. The modifier is directly behind me and I’m standing just under the modifier. This provides a much more specular look as well as a more slimming light to his face.

Fully flooded and I have rotated the modifier to Bob’s left which darkens the left side of the modifier so that the light is bouncing off of the right side which is the ‘key light’ in the modifier. So the left side is the ‘fill light’ that fills in the right side of Bob’s face. Confused? Research how focusing arms work on the web….

Same as above, but the light is fully focused.

I didn’t shoot Bob in the mid focused position, but this is what it looks like. You can see that the light has a much different quality in this position.

So remember this is ONE LIGHT, ONE MODIFIER and simply angling the modifier to the left or right or focusing or flooding the light produces dramatically  different looks. It’s just ONE of the reasons I love focusing arm modifiers. And the SMDV 110 is perfect for my needs. Well made, well designed and the quality of light it produces makes it a great choice for me. Oh and the weight and ease of assembly is just icing on the cake!

03 Mar 2018

Flashpoint R2 Pro C – Updated March 4 2018

UPDATE March 4 2018

Yesterday I was commissioned to create imagery of a dancer for an upcoming magazine cover. It was all on location and I was using xPLOR600s one with a H600 remote head. All of the locations were outdoors. In the first location I was completely outside with no walls or ceilings around me. The Flashpoint R2 Pro C worked flawlessly. When I moved into an area where two vertical walls were present that’s when my troubles began. The strobes would not fire. I had to restart my camera (1DX Mark II) as well as restart the R2 Pro. The strobes would then work for about 4 flashes and then the same issue would occur. I got my shots and then moved to the final location. Again one without walls, but during the last portion I was shooting in a tunnel which of course has walls and a ceiling. In all but the aforementioned venue the R2 Pro worked flawlessly. I’m not certain what would have caused the misfiring. I have my trigger set at the 0-30 meter setting and the strobes were well within those distances. Strange….

First location, no walls or ceiling. R2 Pro worked flawlessly.

This was a light test and I was not happy with the light so I moved him back into the shaded part of the structure you see in the background. During this light test the unit performed flawlessly.

Once I moved in between the walls the R2 would misfire as is evident in this image.

After rebooting both my camera and the R2 the strobes would fire, but only for about four flashes. 

Moving on to the next location without walls or a ceiling, again the R2 performed perfectly.

Well into the tunnel that has both walls and a ceiling the R2 performed perfectly. Both strobes without incident.

I am literally at a complete loss for why the R2 would misfire in my second location. So as a backup I now plan to carry both the R2Pro and an X1 whenever I go on location. I am using rechargeable alkaline 1.5v AAs in the unit which were fully charge. I have another outdoor on location shoot this coming Friday so I’ll be taking both.

UPDATE December 9 2017

I just returned from a two day studio session using the Flashpoint R2 Pro C on my Pentax 645Z. The unit performed well and I discovered that when using the transmitter with another non Canon (C) camera the Standby feature does not function as it does on the camera it’s designed for. I have the R2Pro set to Stby in the menu and when mounted to my Canon when I half press the shutter the R2 comes back to life. Not so with my Pentax. I must physically press any button on the R2 unit to revive the transmitter. Other than that (no TTL or HSS) it works well.

UPDATE November 15 2017

I recently had the opportunity to use the Flashpoint R2ProC during a commercial session.  The short story is it worked flawlessly. My issue with the XT32C sometimes misfiring when standing right next to my key light did not occur at all. I have the unit set to 0-30m distance in the Custom Functions. The most significant feature I can highlight at this point is being able to view most if not all of my strobe settings at once. It’s wonderful. I did run into one issue that is totally user error when attempting to use the ALL button to change all of my light settings…

Even though I was only using groups A and B I had left all of the group settings ON.

I had left A-E lights active but for this session I was only using two lights. I became frustrated when trying to adjust all of the lights at once since the unit seemed to only allow a 2 stop range down or up. What I realized when I got home is that by having more than the number of strobes I was using active on the screen, the unit will only go up or down based on the lowest or highest setting of a group.

To explain:

Let’s say group D which you’re not using is set at 1/64th. If you scroll power down and have your units set to 1/128th as the lowest setting all of your adjustments down are limited to just one stop. So the answer when using the unit is ONLY KEEP ACTIVE those light groups you’re actually using. I tried to find this in the user guide but it is not listed. Now you know.

Be sure to just leave the groups you’re using active (ON) or when using the ALL feature you will limit yourself to the lowest or highest group settings for adjustment.

Original Post

The new Flashpoint R2 Pro C. What a great improvement over the previous versions of their transmitters!

I have assembled some of my initial impressions and comments about this transmitter. It will be a few weeks until I can actually use the transmitter in sessions. But that won’t be before I run it through some of my own usability tests. I must admit that I was hoping Godox would develop a transmitter like this. I want to say straight off that in life there isn’t a single thing that is perfect for everyone. I laughed out loud when I read one person was concerned about the angle of the R2 Pro which they felt is ‘too angled’ and forced them to tilt their camera ‘too much’ to see the display. Another person complained about the R2/X1 controller having no tilt and hitting him in the forehead when he looked through the viewfinder. All things can be improved including human attitudes. The important thing is if a piece of equipment is right for YOU. And of course every manufacturer can and should improve their products, and the R2 Pro is living proof of that concept!

For many years I enjoyed the use of the PCB’s CyberCommander with his Einstein line of strobes. Sure the CyberCommanders involved a bit of a learning curve, was not the most elegant interface…BUT it was so well designed from a function/operational standpoint those aforementioned issues seemed petty. I loved being able to view the power settings of all of my strobes in one look. The range of the CyberCommander was excellent and the variety of controls I had at my fingertips made my job so much easier and more importantly was my ability to focus on the talent, not the lights.

One of the things I noticed right off about the R2 Pro was the battery level indicator. (BTW neither the R2/X1 or the XT32 have battery level indicators) I had just put fresh rechargeable Enloop AAs into the unit and in a matter of seconds it went from 3 bars to 2. Strange…so I changed to a new pair and it was the same. I then got out two fresh Duracell Alkalines and guess what? Three bars stayed. Since I had not yet read the manual and figured I needed to put batteries into the unit to follow along I began to search for the answer in the user manual. Page 09 states:

“AA alkaline batteries are recommended…..Low Battery Indicator When the battery power is weak, less than 2.5v…replace them to assure a strong wireless signal and reliable flash triggering.”

Well there you have it. Alkalines are 1.5v and rechargeables are 1.2v. So right off the bat 2.4v is BELOW the 2.5v they recommend if batteries need replacement. This is certainly not a deal breaker even though I use rechargeable batteries for all of my gear. I will research if anyone makes 1.5v rechargeable batteries. And I will have to find out through testing if 2.4v affects the transmitter’s ability to consistently fire my strobes. If not, then it’s back to using alkaline batteries in this unit. It’s also very interesting that the battery indicator does NOT come on immediately when you boot up the unit. There’s about a two second delay before it appears. I surmise that the unit is ACTUALLY testing the battery level before displaying the remaining voltage…..interesting.

I was shocked to see that the battery level was at 2 bars after just putting in freshly charged Enloops….until I read the manual.

I should also state that I am NOT a speedlight user. I may use one now and again, but my work does not lend itself to speedlights. My work involves the use of strobes so I won’t be testing/writing much if anything about the unit’s compatibility with speed lights. Sorry. I’m not a review site, but like to post what I observe to help other shooters who may or may not operate with the gear I talk about. While I’m on that subject I realize that this unit has TCM, TTL Converted to Manual. Never had that, seldom if EVER use TTL. I’m the old school light meter kinda OG and with digital hell I don’t really need to use my light meter all the time. I can get pretty close because I do this so much and adjust my lights/aperture/ISO/Speed after looking at the shot and Histogram. So I will get around to ‘testing’ the TCM at some point and report my findings. It seems like a cool feature though…

The R2 Pro works just as well with my Pentax 645Z as it does with the XT32 and X1/R2 transmitter. For that I’m very happy. Later I’ll test it with my Fuji X100T, but I’m pretty sure it will work on my little Fuji too. AGAIN I’m not a TTL guy

This is just to illustrate the different angles of the R2 Pro and the XT32. Both are mounted on Canon 1DXs. The R2 Pro is in the foreground.

Side by side shooter’s view of the R2 Pro and the XT32C. LOL I just recently discovered that I never removed the plastic film from my XT32 so I just did! Let’s see how long I leave it on the R2 Pro!!!!

Clockwise from top left, the Godox XT32C, the Flashpoint R2 Pro C and the Flashpoint R2 C.

Initial operational observations

HSS and Second Curtain Sync

The R2 Pro requires you to select HSS, Second Curtain Sync or nothing. Unlike the R2/X1 and the XT32 which automatically switch to HSS above Canon’s sync speed, you must enable HSS on the unit or the camera will not go above the sync speed, at least on the 1DX. With the X1/R2 when the shutter is set at 1/30th or slower the camera automatically goes into SCS. The XT32 does not and you must set SCS in the camera’s flash menu when using the XT32. On the R2 Pro C you must set SCS on the transmitter or the flash will remain in first curtain sync. Unless I plan to use SCS I found that leaving the controller in HSS allows it to function in both HSS or normal sync.

Modeling light

In the Group view you must press the MOD button which lights all of the group’s modeling lights. Only then can you turn OFF individual modeling lights for multiple strobes. If you do not turn on all modeling lights in the group view then selecting a specific group with the physical buttons on the left side of the controller does not show the MOD choice on the menu. Sounds confusing I know, but once  you get a unit you will see. I prefer the ability to decide which strobe’s modeling light is on or off and the unit has that ability.

Sound

Like the modeling light I prefer to control individual units beeping, but it appears it’s an all or nothing choice with the R2 Pro. Certainly not a deal breaker! The nice thing is this unit has a Menu button which easily accesses the former “Cf” function area. That’s where you can enable or disable the sound along with other functions.

Individual Group On/Off function

There are often times when I want to turn an individual strobe on or off and this can easily be done with the R2 Pro. You simply go from the Group view to an individual Group and toggle through the choices of M, TTL or Off using the physical Mode key. Easy!

Distance

This is in the Menu area and it’s welcomed. There have been a number of times when I was using my XT32 that I’d get misfires while standing right next to my keylight! It was not all the time, but sporadically and at random times. Now in the Menu area is a DIST choice of 1-100m or 0-30m. In studio and on location I tend to shoot within the 30m distance so it’s nice to have that choice. I’ll be testing to see if I get any misfires when close to strobes. I’ve never had an issue with either my X1/R2 or XT32 at long distances.

ALL

Good god I love having an ALL button that is physical so I can easily turn all of my lights up or down keeping ratios I’ve set before the same. I’ll use this feature all of the time.

Something I’ll miss….

On the XT32 when you change Channels in the upper right hand corner is a little diagram of how the old school dip switches correspond to your channel selection. I know most of you don’t use those old dip switches anymore. But for me when I use my Pentax 645Z and the old FT-16 USB receivers to get HSS with xPLOR/Godox strobes I am often changing channels. It’s pretty idiot proof for me to just look at the diagram and switch those little dip switches. Oh well… I’ll just carry my XT32 as a backup anyway.

I’ll miss those little dip switch illustrations…..

Initial Summary

These are just my initial impressions of the long awaited R2 Pro! And the topics I’ve outline above are the features that are important to me and my work. I have yet to test the unit other than to see how HSS/SCS work and they perform just fine with both the xPLOR/eVOLV line of strobes. I’ll be posting more as I have the time to test the units and finally in commercial work. So stay tuned.

26 Feb 2018

Review: Coolbox – “The World’s Smartest Toolbox” – Updated 2-26-18

UPDATE February 26 2018

OK so after having used the Coolbox on location for a few weeks I have an improvement I’d like to see them make on the next version. The lifting handle opposite of the wheels is way too short. Why you ask? Well it’s fine for lifting the box in or out of the car, but leaning down due to the short handle as you roll it is a pain. It’s because the handle is made primarily for lifting and not rolling the toolbox. My ‘fix’ was to attach some rope to the handle opposite of the wheels so that I don’t have to lean down so far when rolling the toolbox. A friend of mine purchased one for her husband who’s 6-2 and he refuses to use it due to the oversight in designing the pulling handle. She wants to sell it! For now that’s it though!

Original Article

In April of 2016 I along with many other folks contributed to the Indigogo program for Coolbox listed as the “World’s Smartest Toolbox.” I was made aware of the campaign by my photo partner. She said “Mark, check this out! So much of what they plan to build into this thing meets our needs!” So of course I plunked down my 199.00 plus 50 bucks in shipping and supported their campaign. Their original delivery date was scheduled for July 2016, a mere three months from my payment…not bad. Fast forward several months, then several years and nada, no Coolbox. But they kept communicating which was much better than the Kickstarter fiasco I invested in for a Kraftwerks bullshit device that never appeared.

Today, January 15 2018 I received my Coolbox and am thrilled with the product. I know it’s built for many different purposes, but for a working photographer who does studio shoots in a number of locations, this thing ticks so many boxes. I have used two canvas tool bags to carry my grip equipment which includes Super Clamps, DIY truss clamps, gaff tape, extension cords, you name it. I also take along a portable Bluetooth speaker to keep things lively during sessions, having the talent tap into the speaker with their favorite tunes on their cell phones. I shoot tethered to an iPad and as such take a stand specifically to hold the iPad so my clients can view the images in real time. Extension cords for smoke machines along with power reels so I have plenty of outlets. Then USB charging ports to power my phone, recharge my iPads, etc. Well guess what? Damn near ALL OF THOSE things are built into the Coolbox!

The Coolbox has a clear lift up panel that protects two USB charging ports, one a 2A and the other a 1A from water. The AUX female input is for playing music without using the Bluetooth feature. The Mode and UP and Down arrows adjust the clock. As silly as it seems having a clock on this is a godsend for me. During sessions I have to keep on schedule and having the clock will be epic! The speakers built into the box are very good in sound! Wow I didn’t expect them to be so good. Now just one less thing I have to pack….or forget! Oh and to the top right of this image is the bottle opener! Never too early for a root beer! LOL!!!

On the left side are the wheels (yay it rolls!!!) along with three 110v power outlets. The power outlets are covered by a plastic flip up lid that protects them from water.

Another seemingly ‘silly’ feature is the cell phone holder located on the front of the unit. I always silence and place my phone in my camera bag during a session and often forget which ‘pocket’ I’ve stored it in! Now I don’t have to wonder!

In their video the original design shows a retractable cord. The actual final design has an exterior cord wrap. Fine by me.

The top of the box has a built in slot that holds a tablet. This is my iPad Mini Pro with cover which fits very nicely. Now this will replace the stand I traditionally use for clients to view the iPad! In their video they show that the top lid has a magnetic surface to hold bolts, screws, etc. The top is NOT magnetic in the final product.

And there is an interior tablet holder too!

The white board is double sided as well as removeable. It’s cool that they’ve thought of placing a dry marker holder on the lid! (Marker not included BTW)

This is the lift out tray that neatly holds so many of the grip tools I utilize on a regular basis!

OK THIS IS EPIC! See that LED strip light at the bottom of this photo? Well it has two levels of intensity but what’s brilliant is that it ILLUMINATES THE INTERIOR OF THE BOX!!!! OMG having a light to see black on black grip gear is better than sliced bread!

AND the LED strip light detaches from the box and can be hand held. It recharges off the internal battery or while you’re charging the box simply by plugging it in.

Empty box with the light replaced so you can see the volume.

My new Coolbox replaces the canvas bags I use to haul all of my grip gear to sessions! I cannot tell you how happy and more organized this tool makes my life!

So the only bit of bad news? As of this post, January 15 2018 I see on their website that the Coolbox is backordered. Bummer. But if you feel it will fit your needs, GET ONE. As time goes on I’ll be updating this post to report if I’m still in love….

25 Feb 2018

On location with the AD200s and AD-B2s

I was asked to create some trombonist’s imagery for his upcoming Fall 2018 CD release. I’m not a fan of doing classical musician’s portraits simply because most of the time they just want a head shot with their instrument….YAWN! I often refer them to other photographers as I have little interest in that type of photography. But both the musician and his marketing director agreed to allow me the freedom to art direct the shoot so I agreed. 

Having worked with a number of symphonies I am well aware that there is a good natured (sometimes not so good natured!) rivalry between strings, percussion and brass players. So I thought that creating his portrait on the beach over a string instrument bonfire would be so appropriate and fun! Most important – it matches his personality! I had an old cello I had cut to photograph the interior for a different shoot years ago along with a prop violin that I was willing to burn. They flew into San Francisco from Nashville and we were off to the beach!

My decision for photography gear was to use my AD200s and the AD-B2s I own. Plenty of light and easily transportable since I had to lug all of the gear onto the beach. (I HATE lugging!) For the modifiers I used Aputure Fresnel heads as I love their focusing ability and those modifiers would match the style of light I wanted for the session. They’re also dead easy to gel and grid too.

How the scene appears just before sunset in natural light.

Quick light test before all the fun begins. His marketing person was going to eat all of the marshmallows before we began! She apparently LOVES them! 

It’s always fun to let the talent look at my iPad which is wirelessly tethered to my camera. I find it helps relax people as I’m setting up the session.

Yet another light test to ensure the marshmallows are well lit! Hahahahaha

Ah the smell of burning string instruments! What could warm a brass player’s heart more than that?

A fun shot for the back of the jewel case.

The AD200s mated to the AD-B2s are remarkable pieces of gear. So portable and so versatile. I love the flexibility they allow me both in studio and on location. Why not use my AD600s? I believe in using the right tool for the right job. The 600s would have been overkill from a power standpoint and much heavier to lug onto the beach.

25 Feb 2018

Flashpoint AD-B2 Review updated February 25 2018

UPDATE February 25 2018

I’ve written an on location post where I’ve utilized both the AD200s and AD-B2s.

UPDATE January 26 2018

I’ve recently written a post about my use of the xPLOR600/eVOLV200s with several different modifiers for a session. You can find that post here.

UPDATE December 9 2017

I recently conducted a two day session using two eVOLV200S mounted to an AD-B2 unit shot through a Cheetahstand Quick strip box. The strobes were used as second key lights combined with my xPLOR600 with remote head shot through a CononMark 120CM focusing octa modifier. The units performed well and the stopping power of the units is excellent. I shot all sessions using a Pentax 645Z whose sync speed is limited to 1/125th of a second. During jumping action shots the strobes froze the action of the talent jumping. I’m continually pleased with the performance of both the eVOLV and xPLOR  units. It should also be noted that I was able to complete two full days of shooting without charging either the eVOLV or xPLOR units.

The two eVOLV200s in the AD-B2 can be seen behind the Cheetahstand Quick Strip box in the center of the seamless.

Full body shot of the talent as she performed a leap into the air.

Full crop of the necklace to illustrate the stopping power of the strobes.

UPDATE October 2 2017

I have written a post about a dance session I conducted that uses these items. You can view that post here.

UPDATE September 10 2017

I recently posted an article on my use of all Godox units in one session. The article includes the use of this product. You can view that post here.

UPDATE August 25 2017

Although this is not specifically about the Flashpoint AD-B2 you can see how I’ve used one with a Parabolix 35D for a recent commercial shoot. And although I won’t be able to share any images for about two months it worked fantastically! 

UPDATE August 21 2017

I did a little test getting 1.3 more stops of light out of an S Bracket.

UPDATE August 20 2017

So yesterday I did something I have a tendency to do… over reach. Using different lighting configurations, new/different modifiers I wanted to test them all in one night! What an idiot and no I did not test them all!

I am booked for a shoot next week where I will be filmed in a BTS segment that is part of something else (can’t say). I’m told it will be shown in movie theaters nationally to promote one of my clients. My partner has admonished me to NOT dress like the homeless as is my normal couture style! So I plan to take two of my AD-B2s to do an executive’s head shot and needed to test my ‘theory’ if they would work. My partner who is the film maker must haul all kinds of gear up with her as well as my own so our combined weight/space limits will be at a premium for our flight.

I’ve always loved what I call ‘clam shell portraits’ which may be a term only I utilize. I’d venture to say that if you Google that term it may result in images of clams… My definition is using two modifiers stacked one on top of the other while shooting through the gap between them. In the ‘old days’ I would use a reflector on the bottom to bounce light up toward the talent. I know many pros who love doing it that way. But now I only occasionally use reflectors because the control I have over modern strobes makes using a reflector seem a bit old fashion. Anyway the other thing I wanted to test was to determine if my little clam shell configuration and the AD-B2s with eVOLV200s were strong enough to do full body portraits. Oh and if you’re concerned about the catch light in the talent’s eyes, using a lower reflector produces the same double catch light…..

So what do I think? I love the AD-B2s! Here’s why:

Is it worth the $39.05 price difference between the S Mount bracket? For me it is. Compared to an S Bracket I get more light out of it, can combine two eVOLV20os if I so desire AND I get a modeling light! Now if I used my AD360s more often I ‘may’ rethink my stance, but I’ve found I rarely use them now and only when I need them as extra lights. And even then I don’t get a modeling light, but since they’re rarely key lights it doesn’t matter. The convenience of having a modeling light for me is key. Sure getting a bit more light out of the AD-B2 is nice as well, but functionally for me the one thing that was lacking with the S Bracket was a modeling light when using the eVOLV’s bare bulb attachment. I depend on that to obtain focus more than to see what my light will look like.

So here’s how I used them for the test:

The top modifier is a Glow ParaPop 38″ Portable Softbox for Bowens mounts. I love how fast this thing sets up and the light it produces is creamy. I am using both the inner and outer diffuser in it. The bottom modifier is the Phottix 27.5″ Luna Folding Beauty Dish, White with the diffusion panel attached. If you’re wondering why I’m using the older USB triggers on the flashes, it’s because they allow me to use HSS with my Pentax 645Z. Also only one bulb was used in each of the AD-B2’s.

Please don’t mistake Cheyenne’s distance from the modifiers as the way she was when I photographed her. These images are my secondary thing to snap, as they were JUST for you guys. I had forgotten to take several shots and said to her “Oh shit, I forgot to take the BTS shot of the BTS! Can you just stand there for a minute?” My main purpose was to test my theories.

When I read/see other reviews I’m always a bit put off by seeing the ‘final polished’ shot that has gone through post processing/retouching/etc. I understand why most do that, the model’s desire to only have shots of them posted that way. Or photographers who only want to show their final work. But for me I find that an unretouched image really shows me what I’m looking for with light. OH and I know that most shooters like the expression of their models to be ‘serious or sultry‘ which is fine. But when that’s all I see I find it becomes myopic. So for this test along with my others for the Parabolix I asked Cheyenne to be herself. It’s just one of the reasons that makes her so damn beautiful.

I used a black backdrop for two primary reasons. First I am a big user of rim lights and wanted to see how using my clam shell method would help separate the talent from the background. I specifically chose Cheyenne due to her dark brown hair which can easily get lost against black. I love the look a traditional rim light gives the talent, but other times I want the separation to have a different less obvious look. For some work I prefer this look over a traditional rim light. The second reason I used black is in another review of the Parabolix modifier.

UPDATE August 19 2017

Later this evening I will be testing many different modifiers along with the eVOLV ADB2. But until that shoot I wanted to share some things other may find useful. First and foremost one of the little irritating aspects of the Godox S Mount bracket and the new eVOLV ADb2 is its ratcheting handle. CLICK CLICK CLICK Dammit why is it so hard to move?! I think I understand why it was designed that way, but it was an irritation to me. Instead of bitching about anything I was taught to come up with a solution. So long ago I tried many things, replacing one of the toothed washers with a smooth plastic one, fabricating my own rubber or fabric washers, but none worked well enough. Sure I could move the pivot easily, but with anything heavy it would gradually ‘creep’ downward no matter how much I tightened down the handle.

And then I thought back to my Dad’s (who was an engineer) never coddling words, “Boy, when you try to design anything, use the most simple design. Don’t be so stupid!” So what I decided to try was to take one of the toothed washers on each side and file them down halfway. And guess what? Dad was fucking rightAGAIN. Leaving 50% of the teeth on the washers allows them to still ‘bite’ into their corresponding toothed counterpart, but makes rotating the light stand swivel SO MUCH EASIER! No I cannot adjust it in my OCD micrometers like I like to do with brackets without teeth, but it’s way better!

When you disassemble to bracket you will notice that each removable washer has teeth on one side and molded channels on the other. Those channels keep the washer from rotating so be sure to align them when you reinstall the handle.

You can see how much material I removed from the OEM version. I used my vice and a flat file, but you can always just use a piece of sandpaper laying on a flat surface. Be careful not to sand off your fingertips! You need those to pick your noses! Hahahahaha

The other thing I like to do with both my new ADB2s as well as my Portable 600ws Extension FlashHeads are to cover them for transport. I always remove the bulbs from all units before shipping my lights. I learned my lesson after having two break when airline luggage handling monsters must have thrown my Pelican cases 1,000 yards! LOL. So I use  JTL Protective Flash Tube Covers for all of my xPLOR and extension heads. I originally purchased those covers to save space on my Rovelights, which I returned long ago. But that is another story that was resolved….

You don’t HAVE to protect the face of either, but in my mind I’d rather spend 6 bucks a cover as insurance to protect the socket holes and LED lights on each unit. It does make space savings a bit more challenging, but for me it’s worth it. For the extension heads I often insert the pronged end into the flash head, as it then protects both, but it’s tough on packing space.

So of course the bulbs wouldn’t fit when leaving them in an ADB2s with the cover I mentioned. I remove the bulbs whenever I’m shipping or packing them. So here I found that good old Edward at Cheetahstand makes these nifty Protection Caps for Cheetah Light for the 200 bulbs! So that’s what I use and they’re great. To my knowledge he’s the only one who makes or offers them.

So the bulb protector comes in that little zip lock plastic bag. On a video he has somewhere he shows how he uses a plastic bag as ‘padding’ when inserting a bulb into his little protector. Basically you place the bulb in the bag leaving space on both ends. You twist the bag so one tip looks like the head of an UNUSED condom (!) and then slide the bulb and plastic bag into the tube. The twist at the end is the padding that keeps the front of the bulb safe. Very nifty!

All tidy and ready to pack. 

I don’t know about you, but I cannot even count the number of bags I’ve amassed over the years. And my GF is CONSTANTLY telling me to ‘give some away dammit!’ but of course I never do. So this little camera bag from LowePro I bought ten years ago works PERFECTLY to hold three eVOLV 200s, two ADB2s with covers and three bulbs in their little silver nests. Perfect for heading to a local shoot…. like tonight!

Original Post

The back of the AD-B2. The slot on the left is “slot 1” and the one on the right is “slot 2”

It’s no secret that I admire the innovation of Godox’s line of strobes. The Xplor line of lights along with the eVOLV 200s are wonderful for my work. The flexibility of combining lights into a single more powerful head shows such innovation. When Godox announced that they were producing the AD-B2 bracket I was thrilled. The one thing I missed when using a bare bulb head with the eVOLV200s was a modeling light. I seldom use modeling lights to view how my modifier/angle of light/etc. is going to look. Instead I depend on modeling lights to obtain focus, as I often work in very dark places during studio sessions. And I tend to use the bare bulb attachment more than the Fresnel head which does have a built in modeling light.

I have not had the opportunity to actually ‘use‘ the light bracket yet, but plan to do so on two upcoming commercial shoots. But I needed to test the unit to see how it performs which I always do prior to using any gear on the job. I tested the bracket using an eVOLV200 with the bare bulb attachment, first with an S Bracket and then compared to the xPLOR600 using two bulbs/eVOLVs in the AD-B2. For all of the testing I used a Bowens Maxilite 65 degree General Purpose Reflector, my favorite general purpose hard reflector. The one disadvantage of the Maxlite is the depth of the mounting collar. It’s about 3/4 of an inch deeper than some other generic reflectors so it tends to sap a bit of power by having the bulb more recessed into the cone.

To compare power I used each light with the Maxlite cone attached and fired it against a white wall and then measured the f stop at the opposing wall which is about 11 feet away. I do that because I’ve found it replicates the amount of power loss I get when using modifiers. This is NOT a scientific test, so if you’re looking for EXACT measurements you’d be better served looking elsewhere or doing it yourself.  I used a Sekonic L-358 meter set at 1/100th shutter speed ISO 100. Here are my findings:

1 eVOLV200 using a single bulb

  • S Bracket (bulb is pushed into the cone at the same distance of the AD-B2’s bulb) f11
  • AD-B2 f13

Next I used the AD-B2 with two eVOVLs and 2 bulbs

  • xPLOR600 f18
  • AD-B2 with two bulbs f18

So it appears that light leaking out of the back of the S bracket may cause a small loss of power. It also may be an advantage that the AD-B2 has a more reflective surface than an S Bracket which has none. More interesting is the 600’s results compared to the AD-B2 with two bulbs! I can only surmise that it may be due to the 600’s bulb being more recessed into the cone than the AD-B2’s…..

When only using one eVOLV200 you can either place the bulb in the center or in the top socket.

It “appears” to me that the three step modeling light is brighter than my xPLOR600. But it may just be wishful thinking….

My trusty Bowens Maxlite reflector.

One unit in slot 1

You can see that the xPLOR600’s bulb sits more recessed into the Maxlite by about 3/4 of an inch.

The bulb(s) of the AD-B2 sit further into my Maxlite which ‘may’ explain the added power compared to the xPLOR

Here you can see that the Bowns Maxlite has a collar that is deeper than other reflectors.

In the images below you can see the weight difference for yourself.

You should note that the AD-B2’s swivel adjustment handle does NOT pull out like the S bracket or the xPLOR600 handles. I don’t think it will be an issue, but won’t know that until I actually use it in the field.

I will say that I plan to purchase two more of the AD-B2 units. They are very reasonable in price and the advantage of having a modeling light(s) and the ability to use two unit when needed is wonderful. I will update this post once I utilize the unit(s) on the job.

22 Feb 2018

Glow Easy Lock X-Large Deep Beaded Silver Umbrella

Wow! I’ve read about ‘deep umbrellas’ for some time now and have tended to “poopoo’d” them. Sure higher end companies like Profoto manufacture deep umbrellas, but for their price point I’d rather go with an octabox. I had been a huge fan of PCB’s PLM umbrellas and still utilize them from time to time, but had made a move to more ‘professional’ (bullshit word btw) modifiers like Parabolix. I love the look of focusing arm modifiers produce. Punchy, yet soft when you want soft. Focused when I want focused light. I now find ‘normal’ softboxes boring in what they produce and when I want to keep spill with softboxes, I’d have to use grids. Not so with a focusing arm modifiers. This deep umbrella prevents “spray light everywhere” situations like normal umbrellas and non gridded softboxes.

Prior to using focusing arm modifiers my go to octa was the Elinchrom Rotalux Deep Octabox 39″. The light that modifier throws is magical. So when I saw the Glow was offered in the same ‘pebbled’ texture silver interior fabric as my beloved Eli 39, so I opted for that model. BTW I continue to use the Eli 39″ in both a diffused and focusing arm configuration. During a client’s session they allowed me to use the Glow 65″ in some ‘test shots’ with their talent. I used it as the key light, camera right for two of the actors. The fill light was camera left and I was using a 69″ Elinchrom Oct which I have adapted to use a focusing arm. In this configuration I had it in the fully flooded position. In another post I have displayed my shot using the 69″ Eli with a focusing rod.

The actors are in costume for the play “The Elephant Man.”

The softness, control and contrast using this is very similar to a focusing arm modifier. The ability to control spill is wonderful. Only adjusted for color balance and contrast. You can obviously see her wig netting. I like to post stuff out of cam so you can see the modifier’s results. 600Pro was the strobe

Slight adjustments to angle produce wonderful results. 600Pro was the strobe. 

So the question is, would I use the Glow instead of the Parabolix, CononMark or Zeppelins. The simple answer to that question is ‘no’ I have yet to find a single modifier that can do EVERYTHING well. BUT when choosing the right tool for the right job I would not hesitate to use the Glow Deep with pebbled silver interior. As a matter of fact I plan to obtain the two smaller units as well. The ROI and ease of setup and striking of an umbrella is undeniable. What The Glow line has done is mitigate the down sides of the lowly umbrella for a price that presents an unbelievable value. And for me no matter how ‘cheap’ a piece of gear may cost, if it doesn’t produce EXCELLENT light when I’m using it, then it doesn’t get used.

For people on a budget I cannot think of a better modifier to use. And for people who make their living shooting, it’s an incredible tool to add to your bag.

16 Feb 2018

Xplor/Godox600, eVOLV200 and Pentax 645Z, HSS!!! Updated 2-16-18

UPDATE February 16 2018

I have confirmed that the new Flashpoint/Godox AD600 Pro works in HSS with the Pentax 645Z as explained below.

UPDATE September 8 2017

In my post about the Parabolix 35D I have some of my recent client work which was just released. All of those images were shot using HSS with my 645Z.

UPDATE August 31 2017

A visitor recently asked if the older AD360 line of strobes achieve HSS with a Pentax 645Z based on the method I describe below in my original article. The answer is YES it does. Rather than just ‘say yes’ under an ‘assumption’ that it would I decided to actually test it. I’m preparing for a dance session in two days and my partner who is making the move to all xPLOR/eVOLV units herself asked if she could borrow my old AD360s for the shoot. As a gift I had purchased an xPLOR TTL 600 for her so she wants to combine that with my old AD360s using my XTR-16 receivers. So a quick test before charging all of the units for her proves that the AD360 line works!

Pentax 645Z 1/1000th, f5.0, ISO 100. When using an older AD360 you need to manually set the strobe to HSS on the light itself. And if you’re going to ask me why I didn’t shoot this against a pure white seamless, I just did this as a courtesy to a reader. There’s no banding and if you want to see FOR YOURSELF, test it yourself.

UPDATE August 20 2017

I ran a test yesterday of various modifiers along with the new AD-B2 mount and discovered that when you are using the USB receivers in the eVOLV200s the only level of modeling light that can be activated on the AD-B2 is the lowest level from the FT-16 controller.

UPDATE: July 29 2017

I have just completed testing HSS with the eVOLV200 strobes with my Pentax 645Z. I have included my test shots with “Bob” and all Flashpoint USB triggers and Cactus v6II settings are the same as the Xplor/Godox 600 lights. But I have outlined how I set the eVOLV200 lights below.

All test shots with the eVOLV200 were shot at 1/2 power using the bare bulb head through a Fresnel modifer. It is necessary to disable all built in wireless receivers in the eVOLV200. The USB plug in receivers are necessary to make this work. You must also engage HSS using the button rather than depending on shutter speed on the remote to automatically engage HSS.

I’m using the ‘old’ 433mhz USB receivers along with the FT-16 transmitter. (see full setup in my Original test below)

Reference shot using only ambient light. The modifier I like to use is a Fresnel lens. It effectively replicates the look of sunlight.

1/500th f4.5 ISO 100 Pentax 645Z eVOLV200 at 1/2 power, bare bulb attachment.

1/1000th f4.5 ISO 100 Pentax 645Z eVOLV200 at 1/2 power, bare bulb attachment.

1/1600th f4.5 ISO 100 Pentax 645Z eVOLV200 at 1/2 power, bare bulb attachment.

1/2500th f4.5 ISO 100 Pentax 645Z eVOLV200 at 1/2 power, bare bulb attachment.

1/3200th f4.5 ISO 100 Pentax 645Z eVOLV200 at 1/2 power, bare bulb attachment.

1/4000th f4.5 ISO 100 Pentax 645Z eVOLV200 at 1/2 power, bare bulb attachment.

A few people contacted me to let me know they have been able to use HSS with a Pentax 645Z using other brands of lights with the Cactus v6II which I very much appreciated. But even though they have had HSS/645Z success with Profoto’s B1’s, Speedotrons, Photogenic Studio Max, etc. I wanted to make this work with the Flashpoint/Godox line of lights. Why? Well because for my work they fit my workflow with incredible innovation and the largest eco system of strobes. Using an xPLOR600 as either a monolight or pack/head system is just one reason. Combining two of them to make a single 1200 ws head when I need that power, creating their upcoming eVOLV200 twin head all combine to make it the line I love to use. I’ve had my fill of purchasing other strobes just for my 645Z, namely Priolites to achieve HSS. Now I no longer have to use separate brands of lights to do my commercial work no matter what brand of camera I’m using for the job at hand. And that’s great since I use three different brands of cameras!

Thank you to Cactus for developing a tool that is both remarkable and functional. It’s been a godsend for my work.

Original Test Review

Flashpoint R1 Flashpoint Commander Transmitter

To put it simply HALLELUJAH!!!! Oh my gosh for the past four years I have wanted with all of my want to have an option for HSS and my Pentax 645Z other than my MBX1000 Hotsync Priolites. Priolites do NOT use HSS, but rather hypersync and as the shutter speed increases the slight shading of banding increases as well. I’m not talking about black bars, but what looks like a graduated neutral density filter was applied to the image. Sure I could remove it in those instances where it’s obvious, but in my mind for $2600.00 per light it should NOT be something I have to do. Anyway there are several other issues that bothered me, but as ‘the only game in town’ for shutter speeds over 1/125th of a second when using strobes, I like other shooters was stuck. Ricoh never manufactured modern leaf shutter lenses for the 645 and based on their current financial situation and market share I seriously doubt they will. Plus leaf shutter lenses are expensive and limited to whatever focal length is produced. It’s one of the limits that smug shooters of Phase One or Hassy bring up when talking about the 645Z. I just laugh and now I snicker…

So here’s how I figured it out. I now use a Flashpoint R1 Flashpoint Commander Transmitter with older 433mgh USB receivers in my Xplor/Godox 600 strobes. The FT16 is placed on top of a Cactus v6II transceiver. And as you can see by the shots I’ve displayed below it’s a godsend. Will I miss 1000ws from my Priolite? Oh hell no, not when I can simply combine two Xplor600s and hook them to my 1200ws head. HSS using my beloved Xplor600 with my Pentax 645Z means Christmas came in July 2017 for me this year! Hallelujah!!!

How the scene looked in mid day Bay Area sunlight. That’s my buddy “Bob” who fills in for my tests.

One of my trusty USB receivers plugged into my Xplor 600

All radio signals turned off and HSS enabled. You MUST physically enable HSS on the strobe to make this work. The quarter power is just what I selected for the test. And yes you can use any power level you want.

On the Cactus v6II set the Camera System to Pentax.

On the Cactus v6II set the Flash System to Manual Flash.

The Flashpoint R1 Flashpoint Commander Transmitter goes on top of the Cactus.

1/500th f4.5, ISO100 Xplor600 at 1/4 power.

1/1000th f4.5, ISO100 Xplor600 at 1/4 power.

1/1600th f4.5, ISO100 Xplor600 at 1/4 power.

1/2500th f4.5, ISO100 Xplor600 at 1/4 power.

1/3200th f4.5, ISO100 Xplor600 at 1/4 power.

1/4000th f4.5, ISO100 Xplor600 at 1/4 power. That’s the 645Z’s max shutter speed.

A pulled back shot of the scene at 1/4000th f4.5, ISO100 Xplor600 at 1/4 power.

Will I like it if Cactus develops a firmware update for their triggers so that I don’t have to use the USB receivers? Sure! It would also mean I could use my eVOLV200s with my 645Z too. But for now I’m damn happy to have figured out how to use my 600s in HSS with my 645Z. No shaded banding whatsoever using my Xplor/Godox strobes.

I truly am one happy person!

15 Feb 2018

One Eyeland 2017 Photography Award

I am proud to have been awarded Finalist status in the Professional Fine Arts Nude category of the 2017 One Eyeland Photography Awards for my “Tango in Water” submission. Five images make up my series of tango images. Shot in Seattle in studio using water to accentuate the delicious movement of Argentine Tango.

Professional Fine Art Nudes Finalist list

Winning Fine Arts Nude image series for 2017

05 Feb 2018

Adorama Glow ParaPop 38″ Review

38″ Glow Pop. In this image it’s shown with the speedlight mounting bracket, but I use the Bowens mount attachment since I never use speedlights.

Like all things I believe in ‘the right tool for the right job.’ That includes MANY facets like packing ability, weight, ease of set up and most important,  light quality. I tend to be brand agnostic on most of my gear except for the strobes I use. I’m not here to impress other photographers, but to impress my client base. I’m not a teaching shooter or gear reviewer by trade.

So for a recent assignment I was asked to photograph a group of symphonic musicians in the lighting style of the Dutch Masters. Their entire 2018-19 marketing campaign is based on that style. Not a big deal BUT in addition to that session I was asked to photograph a live concert, some still life imagery and various other portraits. Which meant my airline luggage limits would be severely tested. And moving around the entire venue to capture all of what the client needed was also a consideration. So instead of packing multiple Parabolix, Elinchrom or Westcott modifiers – I opted to take my Glow Pop modifiers. Why? Well they are light weight, easy to setup/break down, small to pack and using them the right way produce excellent light.

I had manufactured my DIY focusing rod for any Bowens modifier so I took that with me to use with the 38″ Glow Pop. Soft light, no problem, hard light, no problem, controlling spill no problem, controlling feathering no problem. Keep in mind I use most of my modifiers WITHOUT any diffusion panels. My partner does use the Glow Pop with the included diffusion panels for both head shots and film production.

Final shot, Glow Pop camera left using an AD600 with the H600 remote head on my DIY focusing rod mid focused. Camera right is a single AD200 using the Fresnel head and barn doors. Pentax 645Z is the camera.

The client used the image for a billboard off of the Central Expressway in Dallas, TX

Darren and Adam, two of the fellas from Genius House Media happened to be filming there that day. I adore these guys so I asked them to be part of a light test and goof around with still cameras! LOL as you can see we had a great time.

Of course all of us decide what tools are best suited for our own needs. I find that the Glow Pop line of modifiers presents a very good value.

28 Jan 2018

Cheetahstand Quick Lantern and Quick Strip Box review – updated 1-28-18

UPDATE January 28 2018

The client’s use of my publicity work for bus banners. The Cheetahstand Quick Lantern and Quick Strip Box were two of the three modifiers I used for this campaign. 

 

UPDATE December 21 2017

I conducted a dance session using both the Quick Strip Box and Lantern. Below is one of the images I created using just the Lantern with my DIY skirt to control spill.

UPDATE December 9 2017

I recently used a Quick Strip box combined with other modifiers for a studio session. The unit is both quick to set up and provides an excellent quality of light.

I was using the quick strip box as a tandem key light with the CononMark 120CM focusing octa.

Straight out of camera.

UPDATE October 20 2017

My client has incorporated some of my publicity imagery into their marketing campaign.

Original Post

I HATE putting together softboxes, always have. And the worst are strip boxes! Wrestling with those damn rods drives me crazy. So when I heard about Edward’s “Quick” softboxes I thought “Oh sure, just another cheap gimmick from someone….” And boy was I wrong! When I received two of his Cheetah 12″x55″ Quick StripBoxes I was blown away at the design of how they go together. By literally pushing down on a central collar the box is all done! And using Velcro to attach the inner baffle is genius rather than those silly little baby snaps! I leave two of the Velcro tabs attached to the inner baffle and simply fold up the strip box once I’m done. It’s as easy as an umbrella. Oh and the quality of light it produces is excellent. And unlike so many other manufacturers he supplies a quality grid with his units. What’s not to like?

Then there’s his Cheetah 26″ Quick Lantern. I have always used an overhead light for almost all of my dance/portrait imagery. But I was never quite pleased using a strip box, a Fresnel or an umbrella. I often have limited ceiling space so the modifiers I was formerly using made my space too low for dancer’s jumping or they didn’t produce the quality of light I desired. When I first received the lantern I loved the way it assembled and the quality of light it produces. I believe his intent when producing this modifier is to allow even light to be thrown out across a room. It’s great for that, but I wanted to be able to control the light from spilling when that’s the effect I was after. After researching what film people use for overhead lights I found the Chimera Pancake Lantern Softbox with Skirt. So my solution was to cut an old PCB umbrella and make it into the ‘skirt’ for my strobe lantern. I control how the spill flows using old fashion wooden clothespins  to roll up the side of the skirt I want to be exposed. It works great! He produced his own video which shows how the lantern is assembled. 

For my most recent dance sessions my clients wanted to shoot against black seamless. Black seamless is much less forgiving than shooting against other colors. Separating the talent from the background means how one uses light will determine how much separation occurs. So for this session, an overhead and rim lights were absolutely necessary in addition to a key light. The form of dancers is the most important so losing any parts of their body due to poor, insufficient or uneven lighting would be completely unacceptable by me or my client.

My four lighting instruments for this dance session. In the background is the Cheetahstand lantern with my PCB DIY ‘skirt’ to control spill. Then two of his Quick Stripboxes and my trusty CononMark 120cm focusing octa. The lights are all AD/xPLOR600s and the eVOLV200s in a Flashpoint eVOLV Dual Power Twin Head on a boom. The Flashpoint Junior Steel Wheeled Stand which holds the boom and the lantern is INVALUABLE. See how large the footprint is on that sucker!? I would not use anything less for a boom. Plus it goes up to 12 feet!

Lantern and skirt above Azzaza and out of frame are the two stripboxes. Camera left out of frame is the Cononmark. The lantern is the key light in this shot.

Final cropped and edited image.

Lighting test before beginning.

Lantern as key light above, Strip boxes as rim lights

CononMark as key light camera left fully focused at a high elevation, lantern as overhead and strip boxes as rim lights

CononMark as key light camera left partially focused, lantern as overhead and strip boxes as rim lights

CononMark as key light camera left partially focused, lantern as overhead and strip boxes as rim lights

CononMark as key light camera right fully focused, strip boxes as rim lights

CononMark as key light camera left fully focused, lantern as overhead and strip boxes as rim lights

Lantern as key light above, Strip boxes as rim lights

I’m happy with the quality of light produced by his modifiers. The assembly design of these two products is excellent. Edward produces fine products and I never hesitate to use them when they are the right tool for the right job.